Who Invented the Hummer?

Who Invented the Hummer?...

The history of the Hummer began with the Humvee. The Humvee was a vehicle developed by AM General Corp. for the US military. It became very popular and General Motors would go on to cerate a model for civilians which came to be known as the Hummer. The vehicles were first sold in 1992. Background of the Hummer The original Humvees were constructed in the early 1980s by AM General Corporation. The earliest models were made in Mishawaka in Indiana. The Humvees were made at the behest of the US military. The earliest Humvee models were strictly for military use and were fitted with military equipment such as radar. The history of the Hummer was changed when the vehicle was made public. The design of the vehicle captured the media’s attention. The Hummer first got public attention when the vehicle was shown over ESPN. People marveled at how easily it was able to navigate the uneven terrain. However it was the Gulf War that really brought the Humvee into mainstream public consciousness. The Hummer Emerges Sensing the strong public demand, AM General decide to produce Humvees for civilian use. They started making the models in 1992 and change the name from Humvee to Hummer. The next important chapter in the history of the Hummer took place in the year 1998. That was when AM General sold the name rights to General Motors. AM General would continue to produce the vehicles but it was GM that handled the marketing. GM was also responsible for selling the products. The Hummer would prove to be such a hit that GM would later produce other models. The original Hummer was renamed H1 while the newer models were called H2 and H3 respectively. The...
Who Invented the Bicycle?

Who Invented the Bicycle?...

Most historians agree that the man who invented the bicycle was Ernest Michaux. However, before this conclusion came about, there were other people to consider. They contributed greatly to the invention of the bicycle. Ernest Michaux Ernest Michaux actually had a partner in the invention of the bicycle—Pierre Michaux, his father. In the 1860s they built a carriage that looked something like the bicycle people know of today, though yet unperfected. Then in 1861, Ernest finally ended up with the modern bike after doing innovations to it. Installing cranks and pedals, he was given the title—man who invented the bicycle. Running Bikes Before the modern bike came to be, it used to be a running bike. It was what people called “Laufmaschine” or running machine. It was made of wood, had no pedals, and was run by pushing the feet against the ground. Baron Karl Drais Von Sauerbronn, a German, was the man who invented the bicycle Laufmaaschine. He first presented his crude invention to the world in Paris in 1818. This initial invention of the bicycle was earlier heralded by the introduction of the “Celerifere” in 1790. Built by Comte Mede de Sivrac, it was similar to the Laufmaschine but without any means of steering. It just ran straight ahead. Mechanical Crank The addition of the mechanical crank to the bicycle was done in 1839. It was introduced by a blacksmith in Scotland named Kirkpatrick MacMillan. The mechanism that pushed the bicycle—the crank—was placed at the rear wheel. MacMillan was not the man who invented the bicycle but his mechanical crank was a big breakthrough in the invention of the bicycle, the modern type. James Starley Another name popped up in 1870 after the modern bike was invented....
Who Invented the Traffic Signal?

Who Invented the Traffic Signal?...

Early Traffic Signals Traffic lights had been in use even before cars were invented. In those days, people used horses, wagons and other means of transport. But the traffic was still horrible. So in 1868 in London, England, traffic enforcers came up with a basic device: A lantern with two lights – red and green. Green stood for “caution” and red for “stop.” A policeman would turn the lights regularly with a lever. Unfortunately this early traffic light proved unsafe. One model exploded a year later and hurt the operator. Automobiles and the Invention of the Modern Traffic Signals Things made a turn for the worse when cars were invented. In the early 20th century, transportation was in transition. Some people were using the new automobiles, others were still riding horses, wagons or bicycles. They all shared the same roads and streets with pedestrians. A lot of accidents took place as a result. A traffic police officer named William L. Potts, from Detroit, Michigan knew something had to be done. He saw as automated railroad signals as a model for street traffic signals. But the difference was railroads went on a straight path; streets were at right angles. So Potts designed a traffic signal device that could service four-way streets. He used three colors red, yellow (or amber) and green. He put the signal together with electric controls and wires. In 1920, he had it installed on the Michigan Avenue – Woodward corner street. These were the first automatic traffic signals. Detroit police went on to add fourteen more of these in twelve months. Patent for the Invention of the Traffic Signal As useful as Police Officer Potts’ invention was, he was not the first nor the last to...
Who Invented the Stagecoach?

Who Invented the Stagecoach?...

The history of the stagecoach in the US started in 1827 with Concord. It cost over $1,200 to $1,500. The stagecoaches were used to transport people as well as goods. Most of them weighed no less than 1,800 lbs. The Abbot Downing Company As stagecoaches gained popularity, its services began to spread throughout the States. The Abbot Downing Company created over 40 kinds of carriages. Their base was in New Hampshire. The company continued making carriages and wagons until 1919. At its height the company employed 300 people. Stagecoach Facts and Figures The seats were made of leather and each carriage was assigned a number. A look at the history of the stagecoach indicates it was known for its durability. The carriage had boots where luggage could be placed. There was also room at the top of the carriage where other items could be stored. Each stagecoach could carry nine people. It had roll down curtains and three sets of seats inside. If filled to capacity, each individual had 15 inches of space. The carriage moved at an average of 8 mph. There were different types of rides available, with first class travel costing $7. The stagecoach was also used to deliver mail and other goods. Even during the Civil War these carriages continued to ply their trade. Stagecoaches around the World The history of the stagecoach in Europe began earlier in Europe. The exact date is uncertain. However, depictions of stagecoaches were seen in English illustrations in the mid 1200s. However it was not invented and used until the 1500s in Britain. As it became popular, coaching inns spread throughout the continent. Stages and stations also emerged in the US. There are reports that Shakespeare’s plays were conducted...
Who Invented I Heart NY?

Who Invented I Heart NY?...

I Heart NY is a logo made for the advertising campaign launched to promote the tourist destinations in the state of New York. The logo is commonly seen in brochures as well as souvenir shops in the area. It is very simple since the trademark is set in the American Typewriter slab serif typeface. It became an essential part of the popular culture not just in the state but also in the U.S. Due to the popularity of this trademark, many people imitated it. In order to avoid confusion and to resolve conflicts, it is important to know the person who invented I Heart NY. History of the Development of the Logo Who invented I Heart NY? I Heart NY was invented or designed by graphic designer Milton Glaser in 1977. Glaser was recruited by New York State Department of Commerce Deputy Commissioner William S. Doyle to develop a unique but attractive design based on the marketing campaign conceptualized by Wells Rich Greene. The designer did not expect that the logo would be used for a long time since the campaign was only meant to be introduced to the public for a couple of months. In this regard, Glaser gave his service for the state for free. Additional Information and Other Important Details The logo was inspired by other trademarks introduced in the different U.S. states like the I Heart LA (Los Angeles), I Heart SF (San Francisco) and I Heart DF (Distrito Federal). Other trademarks that have similarities with I Heart NY are the I Love NJ (New Japan Pro Wrestling) and I Love NX (New Cross). The logo was also used by American performer New Young Pony Club in the covering of the album entitled Fantastic Playroom....
Who Invented the Segway?

Who Invented the Segway?...

The history of the Segway attests to Dean Kamen (USA) as its inventor. The two wheeled machine was created by Kamen in 2001 and marketed a year later. Background The Segway was also known as Ginger and IT during its development stage. Ginger was in fact a product of the IBOT wheelchair technology that Kamen was working on. The Ginger was developed while Kamen was at the University of Plymouth. The name was taken from Fred Astaire’s dancing partner, Ginger Rogers. The device was also called Fred Upstairs because it had the ability to move upstairs. A book called Code Named Ginger led to all sorts of speculation as to what the product actually was. The speculation would run rampant until the Segway was opened to the public in 2001. A look at the history of the Segway shows that from 2001 to 2006, over 23,000 units had been sold. An official from the company states that as of 2009, over 50,000 units had been sold. Uses The use of the Segway has been restricted to specialized groups and niches. The vehicle has found acceptance among the police and military which use it to carry various types of equipment. The vehicle has also been used to transport equipment and items to warehouses. It is also used in various industries, factories and other similar areas. The vehicle has not found acceptance from the general populace. There are two reasons for it. One is that the price is similar to other vehicles which they are more familiar with. A review of the history of the Segway will show that some people are still uncomfortable about riding a two wheeled self balancing vehicle. The second is that states have different rules concerning...
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