Who Invented the Periodic Table?

Who Invented the Periodic Table?...

The periodic table is a very significant set of scientific information that classifies the various properties of the different chemical elements. Specifically, it is widely used in chemistry, which is one of the most important academic disciplines. Its main purpose is to compare, systematize and classify the behaviors of chemical elements. Besides chemistry, it has a lot of role to play in other academic disciplines such as chemical engineering, biology as well as physics. The Invention of the Periodic Table Who invented the periodic table? In 1869, a Russian chemist named Dmitri Mendeleev invented this table to help show trends in the behavior of chemicals. According to many science historians, he has contributed a lot in other fields including geology, meteorology and hydrodynamics. Likewise, he also spent insurmountable amount of time studying different subjects under chemical technology such as fuels, petroleum as well as explosives. Add to that, he was credited for introducing the metric system to Russia. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Information As of July 2009, the total number of elements included here is 117, which is comprised of elements 1 to 116 and element 118. These elements are categorized into metals, metalloids and non-metals. The metals are further subdivided into various classes, namely alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, inner transition elements, transition elements and other metals. The alkali metals are francium, caesium, rubidium, potassium, sodium and lithium. Under the alkaline earth metals, you can find radium, barium, strontium, calcium, magnesium and beryllium. The inner transition elements are divided into lanthanoids and actinoids. The first group is comprised of lutetium, ytterbium, thulium, erbium and holmium. Additionally, it also includes dysprosium, terbium, gadolinium, europium and samarium. Of course, do not count out the remaining elements under this category,...
Who Invented the Flash Drive?

Who Invented the Flash Drive?...

Introduction The USB flash drive is a tiny storage device that uses flash memory. It connects to a computer via a USB port. A flash drive is usually portable and rewritable. A single device can store anywhere from 64MB to 256GB and more depending on the model’s capacity. Because flash drives are so small and portable, they are ideal for carrying data while on the road. They can also be used to transfer data between two computers. Invention of the Flash Drive In the early days of the computer, things were much simpler. Files were small in size, so floppy disks were enough to store them in. But as computer technology advanced, so did the types of files used. Now floppy disks could only hold 1.44MB of data at a time and they were very slow. There was a need for a better portable storage device. It was IBM and Trek Technology who invented and sold the first USB flash drives in the year 2000. Trek Technology was a Singaporean company. They dubbed the new invention as a “thumb drive” because its size was roughly that of a thumb. In the US and Canada, IBM marketed a flash drive called “Disk On Key” which was made in Israel. The first flash drives had capacity of only 8MB. But this was already a huge leap from the 1.44MB capacity floppy disks in use at that time. Benefits of the Flash Drive The flash drive fulfills the same role as floppy disks, CD-RWs and other removable storage devices. They can be used to back up or transfer data. Floppy disks are now obsolete with new computers rarely carrying them. CD-RWs and other rewritable media are slower and more fragile. Flash drives...
Who Invented Modern-Day Handcuffs?

Who Invented Modern-Day Handcuffs?...

The modern history of handcuffs began with W. V. Adams’ invention in 1862. What set this device apart from others before it were the adjustable ratchets. Before the Handcuffs Emerged Records show that the earliest handcuffs were the one size fits all type. Basically it consisted of metal rings with locks. It could not be adjusted and this led to two main problems. It was too tight for people with large wrists. However it was too loose for people with thin wrists. This all in one handcuff or manacle was used widely during the Medieval Age. While the history of handcuffs may have started in the 1400s or thereabouts, ancient civilizations employed other means for securing prisoners. It’s very likely that rope was one of the earliest devices utilized. Eventually people learned how to manipulate metal and produced chains. The Assyrian and Babylonian civilizations used chains and shackles on war captives. It’s also very likely that many other civilizations used it. John Tower’s Handcuffs Adams’ invention solved the problem of loose fitting handcuffs. His design had notches and a square bow. These notches were used to adjust the locks to fit the wrist. A few years later, Orson Phelps produced another version. Phelps’ version put the ratchet notches in the inner part of the bow. A pivotal point in the history of handcuffs took place in 1865. Businessman John Tower utilized both Adams and Phelps’ inventions and began his handcuff company. The Tower Company would become one of the most successful pre World War II handcuff companies ever. Their cuff had the notches inside. It also came with a three link chain that joined the two cuffs. The other cuffs relocated the keyhole to the bottom area. Their cuffs...
Who Invented Charcoal Briquettes?

Who Invented Charcoal Briquettes?...

The history of charcoal briquettes began when Ellsworth B.A. Zwoyer of Pennsylvania applied for a patent in 1897. But it was Henry Ford who helped popularized its use in the 1920s. Early History It’s not clear as to how Zwoyer came upon the idea of a briquette. But by the end of World War I, the Zwoyer Fuel Company had begun construction of charcoal briquette plants around the US. One of the earliest plants was set up in Buffalo, New York. However it was Henry Ford (with some help from Thomas Edison) who put the briquettes to practical use in 1920. His briquettes were constructed from the wood debris and sawdust in his automobile factory. A close look at the history of charcoal briquettes will point out that E.G. Kingsford purchased these briquettes. Kingsford would commercialize the briquette and mass produce them. At first, briquettes were only available from Ford, but the Kingsford Company began manufacturing several of them. It just happened that Kingsford was Ford’s brother in law. Ford agreed to focus on the auto industry. Kingsford would get in the business of selling charcoal. Kingsford Company would change its name to Kingsford Charcoal. Zwoyer and Ford There are reports that Zwoyer was actually selling his charcoal briquettes years before Ford and Kingsford. It would appear that Ford actually stole Zwoyer’s invention, but Zwoyer didn’t take any action. If he did, there are no historical records to prove it. There are some reports that Zwoyer and Ford actually knew each other. So while some accounts of the history of charcoal briquettes point to Ford as the inventor, the patent records shows this is not the case. Ford did popularize it, and the Kingsford Charcoal would produce different types...
Who Invented the Telephone?

Who Invented the Telephone?...

Alexander Graham Bell owns the patent for the electric telephone (1876). He also has the patent for the phone master patent. But as the history of the telephone will show, several inventors played pivotal roles in its development. From the 1840s to Mid 1870s The very first notion of a telephone occurred in 1844 when Innocenzo Manzetti brought up the idea of a speaking telegraph. But it was in 1849 when Antonio Meucci showed an apparatus capable of communication. However not much is known about this invention. In 1860 some claimed that a German inventor named Johann Reis utilized a device whereby voices were supposedly heard. A year later Reis was able to electrically relay a voice over 300 ft away. In 1874, Elisha Gray displayed an electrical apparatus that sent melodies via telegraph wire. A year later Alexander Graham Bell used an electronic device to relay sounds, which would prove crucial in the history of the telephone. The Gray / Graham Bell Issue This was a crucial point in the development of the telephone. In 1876 Gray sent a caveat to the Patent Office for the phone. That same day (Feb 14) but five hours later, Graham Bell applied for a patent for the phone. Because Gray did not turn his caveat into a patent, the patent was given to Graham Bell. On March 10, 1876, Graham Bell made the first call to his associate Watson. The words were ”Come here Watson, I want you.” In August of the same year Graham Bell conducted the first long distance call to Ontario, a first in the history of the telephone. That same year a Hungarian scientist named Tivadar Puskas created the phone switchboard. In October that year Graham Bell...
Who Invented the MP3 Player?

Who Invented the MP3 Player?...

The very first mp3 player to appear was Winplay3 in 1995. However the history of the mp3 player is best understood by analyzing the history of the technology itself. Origin of Mp3 Technology Mp3 stands for MPEG 1 Audio Layer 3. It was developed in 1991 by the Motion Pictures Experts Group to be part of the MPEG format. There were actually several groups involved in its creation. However it is the German company Fraunhofer-Gesellshaft that releases the license for the music technology. Those credited with creating the mp3 technology are Bernd Kurten, Karl-Heinz Brandenburg, Bernhard Grill, Thomas Sporer, and Ernst Eberlein. The technology was born out of the need to make high quality music but with high compression. The history of the mp3 player and mp3s evolved out of necessity. Before mp3 came along, music files were stored in mostly WAV formats. This sound quality was high but the files were huge. A WAV consisting of a few seconds of sound would be several megabytes in size. Development The project actually developed in Germany in 1987 with the initial aim to find new ways to compress musical data. It was in 1989 when the Fraunhofer group got the patent for the technology. Three years later, mp3 was assimilated into the MPEG technology. A year the standard was implemented. A Brief History of the Mp3 Player The Fraunhofer Company also tried making mp3 players but they were not successful. It was in 1997 when the AMP MP3 Playback Engine player came out. This was invented by Tomislav Uzelac who was working at the Advanced Multimedia Products Company. The player was not sold commercially. However a few months later, students Dmitry Boldyrev and Justin Frankel transported the AMP technology into...
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