Who Invented the Boom Box?

Who Invented the Boom Box?...

No one can say for certain who invented the boom box (also known as ghetto blaster). During the mid 1970s, the idea of a portable stereo became popular. A look at the history of the boom box reveals that Sanyo, Panasonic and Marantz were the pioneers. Cultural Impact The concept behind the boom box was that anyone could own a portable stereo system. While the idea first appeared in the 1970s, it really caught fire in the 1980s and early 1990s. During this period, young people could be seen carrying around boom boxes. Frequently one would see teenagers hanging around together with a boom box and dancing. This scenario would become even more widespread when breakdancing became popular. The emerging hip hp culture also contributed to the popularity of the boom box. There came a point when the boom box became a fashion statement as well. It wasn’t just the sound that mattered; it was the look, the buttons etc. But as an appraisal of the history of the boom box makes plain, the player would fade away in the 1990s. Technological innovations allowed for the invention of smaller audio players. The arrival of CD and mp3 players has greatly reduced the boom box’s popularity. Basic Features The boom box began its life as an extension for the radio cassette player. In the 1970s the cassette recorder became popular, but companies wanted to add AM/FM radio to it. Intense competition would lead to numerous innovations. The most basic features were a couple of speakers and an amplifier with radio tuner. The cassette player was also included. As the history of the boom box unfolded, the cassette player would be complemented (and replaced) by the CD component. The casing was...
Who Invented the Trash Compactor?

Who Invented the Trash Compactor?...

There is no single inventor of the trash compactor. An assessment of the history of the trash compactor shows there are actually several inventions that led to the compactors as we know them today. The Earliest Trash Compactors Most machines use hydraulics to crush compress garbage. Using this definition of a trash compactor, the earliest patent would belong to M. S. Wells. In 1941 he patented an invention to compact oil cans. The mechanisms of his device are similar to the ones used by other trash compactors. This was followed by other inventions. The succeeding ones would improve or add features to the basic compactor. One well known patent is for the Kitchen Compactor. This apparatus was designed by one Mr. Boyd. A study of the history of the trash compactor will reveal that it adheres to the basic principles of trash compactors. In his application, Mr. Boyd declared the machine would use hydraulic pressure to compact trash. This apparatus had to be linked to the water line before it could be used. Boyd’s invention was for houses. That same year Stephen Hopkins came out with a trash compactor for apartments and offices. It did not need a water line to work. Instead it relied on electricity and an internal hydraulic unit. Both Boyd and Hopkins worked for the same company, Compackager Corporation. The Modern Trash Compactors The history of the trash compactor since the 1970s is noted for numerous improvements and innovations. The kitchen compactors today have noise reduction features built in. The pistons used in these devices have also become more powerful and more efficient. In addition, specially designed trash bags have been made for these compactors. Elements like sensors, pre determined pressures and load relievers have...
Who Invented the DVD Player?

Who Invented the DVD Player?...

The history of the DVD player and format is complex. But in simple terms, it emerged because the companies realized that a repeat of the Betamax / VHS rivalry would affect them financially. The first DVD players came out in November 1996 in Japan, developed by Philips. This invention can’t be attributed to one man. There is no clear data that say who exactly invented this device. Therefore, we can only say that Philips created the first DVD player. Other big companies started making their own players shortly after the Philips’ DVD player showed up. The first DVD player in the US was the Sony DVP S7000. It came out in March 1997. How the DVD Format Emerged In 1993, two formats were being touted to replace the CD. One was called the MultiMedia Compact Disc (MMCD). It was supported by Philips and Sony. The other format was the Super Density or SD. This format was backed by Toshiba, Pioneer, JVC and Time Warner. The SD group approached IBM and asked them to use the format for computer data storage. The MMCD group did the same thing. IBM decided to form the Technical Working Group (TWG) to resolve the situation. The group was composed of people from Microsoft, Apple and other major computer companies. In what would prove pivotal in the history of the DVD player, the working group managed to persuade the companies to use a single format. The MMCD and the SD were dropped; the DVD was adopted instead. As work on the DVD began, the companies decided to use technologies from both SD and MMCD formats. One of the technologies applied was EFMPlus, which made the disc more resistant to scratches and smearing. It also allowed...
Who Invented the Sony Walkman?

Who Invented the Sony Walkman?...

Walkman is the brand name of a portable audio cassette player manufactured by Sony. The introduction of the original version of the product altered the habits of consumers when it comes to music listening. Some of the products released by the company with the brand name are the Video Walkman, the Walkman MP3 player as well as the Network Walkman. From its development up to March 2007, the trademark remained popular to music lovers. To know more about the product, it is best to begin with identifying the person behind the development of the Sony Walkman. History of the Trademark Who invented the Sony Walkman? According to reports, the first walkman was developed and designed by Nobutoshi Kihara, an audio division engineer at Sony, in 1978. The product was created for the personal use of the company’s co-chairman Akio Morita. The executive requested Kihara to develop a portable music player that he can use to listen to classical songs during his trips. Because of the efficiency and high quality performance of the product, Sony decided to introduce the music player to the public. The first batch of Sony Walkman was released in Japan in 1979. Additional Information and Other Important Details The first version of the music device is known as the Walkman TPS-L2. The appearance of the device is very simple with the silver and blue theme. When the device was introduced in Great Britain, it came with various accessories such as mini headphone jacks and stereo playback. The product became popular because it allowed two individuals to listen to music at the same time. Aside from this, another special feature of the product is that it can be used to record conversations because it has a built-in...
Who Invented the Microwave?

Who Invented the Microwave?...

One of the fastest, most convenient and easiest ways to cook, the microwave or microwave oven is widely used in many households today. Through dielectric heating, this kitchen appliance can efficiently cook or heat various kinds of food. With the aid of radiation, it is possible to heat polarized molecules as well as water. Aside from its important principles and aspects, it is also good to know the history of this cooking equipment including who invented the microwave. The Invention of the Microwave Who invented the microwave? An engineer named Percy Spencer accidentally discovered the use of microwaves to cook food. In happened some time in the 1940s, when he was trying to build radar sets for the commercial electronics manufacturer Raytheon. He noticed that the chocolate bar situated right inside his pocket melted because of the microwaves that were present in the area where he was working. Thereafter, he went on to experiment and tried to cook popcorn. Next, he and his associates tried to cook an egg, which eventually exploded right in the face of one of them. After that, he and his crew experimented on a metal box, which they fed with microwave power. It became a high-density electromagnetic field, which allowed the food temperature to rise quickly. Raytheon decided to file a patent for Spencer’s invention on October 8, 1945. The kitchen appliance was tested for some time in a restaurant in Boston, Massachusetts. After that, Raytheon decided to build the very first microwave oven called the Radarange. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Information The earlier models of the microwave were big and quite expensive. A basic unit usually measured 1.8 meters or 6 feet tall. Meanwhile, the approximate weight of every product was 340...
Who Invented Atari?

Who Invented Atari?

The history of Atari began in 1972 when the company was founded by Nolan Bushnell and his associate Ted Dabney. Originally the firm was called Syzygy but Bushnell later changed it to Atari. Beginnings and Early Success A year before the company was founded Bushnell hired Al Alcorn to recreate the Odyssey game Tennis for Two. The result was Pong. When the game was released in 1972, it became a huge hit. The Atari Company was founded that same year (the word Atari means go in Japanese. Sometimes it is also translated as to hit the target). The success of Pong (150,000 copies sold) marked a significant turning point in the history of Atari. In 1975, Bushnell sold the company to Warner Communications. It was under Warner that the gaming platform attained success. The Atari 2600 was so popular the sales made up a third of Warner’s profit for the first few years. In 1980 the Atari home video system made nearly half a billion dollars in sales. The 1983 Crash In 1983 sales of video games plummeted in the United States. Atari losses amounted to over $550 million. The following year Warner handed over Atari to Jack Tramiel (former head of Commodore). The Atari St came out and sales peaked at $25 million in 1986. Struggles The next stage in the history of Atari involved its struggles with rival Nintendo. Their rival was winning market share so Atari worked on the Lynx system. It was a handheld console complete with color. The Lynx sold poorly for two reasons. Number one, shortage of components prevented it from being released during the 1989 holiday season. Second it cost twice as much as the Nintendo Game Boy. Tramiel had also stressed...
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