Who Invented Radar?

Who Invented Radar?

The history of radar will show that it began in 1904. German engineer Christian Hulsmeyer created an apparatus capable of detecting an object’s presence some distance away. However, no single scientist invented the modern radar; scientists from several nations worked on it, especially during the 1930s and 40s. Pioneers in Radar Research Hulsmeyer received a patent for his invention in 1904. However it was Nikola Tesla who discovered that frequency could be used to detect the presence of vehicles as well as their course. The succeeding years saw American and European scientists develop various radar devices. Coming on the heels of World War I, nations began to realize how important it could be for warfare. One of the pioneers in the history of radar development was the Frenchman Emile Girardeau in 1934. He got a patent for his work. In 1935 it was put in the Normandie liner. Also that year, America had its first monopulse radar courtesy of Dr. Robert Page. The Russian engineer P.K. Oschepkov invented the RAPID. It could sense the presence of a vehicle within 3 km. A similar model was produced in Hungary a year later by Zoltan Ray. Robert Watson’s Radar System But it was Robert Watson’s invention that showed the radar’s full potential. In 1935, Watson showed his work to the British Air Ministry. During this time, the British were more concerned about the alleged German death ray. Watson stated that such a device was unlikely. At the same his radar impressed the British military that it became part of their defense system, the first in the history of radar. World War II and the Cold War World War II saw more rapid developments in radar technology. Both the British and the...
Who Invented Online Dating?

Who Invented Online Dating?...

Matchmaker.com is on record as the oldest online dating service. Starting in 1986 as a system best described as an online bulletin board, Matchmaker.com was supported on a dial-up modem. Systems like this dominated the 80s to mid 90s and supported connections through local telephone area codes allowing the news to be read, message exchanges as well as participation on message boards and bulletins. Exchanging emails rapidly became popular and many had games or implemented chat rooms. Bulletin board systems (or BBSes) where made targeting avid computers users or lovers unlike the World Wide Web that brought these and other functions to virtually everyone’s finger tips. The 1990s saw advancements in connections that reduced or eliminated the dial-up charges and the use of Bulletin Board systems grew. Because Matchmaker.com moved to the internet in 1996 (almost 10 years after inception), Match.com is seen as the first internet dating service. Created in 1994, Match.com was placed on the internet in 1995 however; there is a distinction between ‘online dating’ and ‘internet dating’. It is this distinction that keeps Matchmaker.com in the pioneering spot. Some reviews date the service’s internet launched to 1998 but upon visiting the online dating site readers will see 1996 as the year noted by the founder. This still puts it behind Match.com in terms of internet launch but it remains established as the first online regardless of which date is accurate because of its BBS history. How Online Dating Started When Gregory Scott Smith and Jon Boede (founder and programmer respectively) planned Matchmaker.com the idea was to design a pen pal service that would run on donations by users to eliminate having to charge a set fee. Located in Houston, Matchmaker started on 4 dial-up lines...
Who Invented the Iron?

Who Invented the Iron?

If there was no one who invented the iron, you could probably imagine how everyone’s clothes would look like after being washed and hanged on the clothesline to dry before using. Most probably, it would look really horrid with all its wrinkles and creases. That is why much gratitude should be extended to the person who invented the iron even though you may probably think that it was designed more as a simpler model than the ones on the market today. To Answer the Needs of Many Housewives Before the emergence of the iron in stores everywhere, many housewives in the early years had a hard time making their clothes look presentable and wrinkle-free. The early procedures included hand pressing, using steam or heat, or rolling procedures just to get things right. Those were the normal situations of the past – that may have seem a bit chaotic in many households – before a New Yorker named Henry W. Seely invented and patented the electric pressing iron on the 6th of June in the year 1882. This invention was named as the “electric flatiron.” Learning More about the Inventor Born in Richville, Kentucky, in July 2, 1854, Henry W. Seely had really gone a long way. Aside from inventions such as creating the first iron device, this inventor also had witnessed a number of patents. If you would do a research, you would see Seely’s name in more than a hundred patents for certain inventions in history. This includes the invention of the light bulb by Thomas Edison. The Early Usage of the First Model Unlike most of the current models, the first few irons that were manufactured years ago were known to use carbon arc. This was used...

Who Invented Mother’s Day?...

The history of Mother’s Day in the US started on May 12th, 1908. That was when Anna Jarvis began campaigning for a day to honor mothers worldwide. After the United States adopted it in 1914, other countries followed suit. It is celebrated on the second Sunday of May in the US but other countries use different dates. Antecedents A look at historical records will show that ancient people also set aside days for mothers. The exact origin of this practice is unknown. However, some historians believe it arose from an early form of earth goddess worship. There is evidence the Romans had their own version of Mother’s Day called Matronalia. This was a day dedicated to the goddess Juno. Mothers were special to her. For this reason, the day was marked by gift giving to mothers. Several European countries have always put aside a Sunday just for mothers. This day is known as Laetare Sunday. The chosen Sunday would vary, but among Catholics it was the fourth Sunday at Lent. This date was actually intended for the Virgin Mary and the mother church. But the history of Mother’s Day shows it became an occasion to celebrate motherhood. Today many countries use the date on the fourth Sunday of Lent. Besides the United Kingdom, other European countries also celebrate Mother’s Day on this date. Mother’s Day in Africa and the Middle East The day is celebrated in many African countries. The modern concept of Mother’s Day was adopted from the British. The way it is celebrated varies per country. Usually it is a mixture of local customs with some European elements included. In many Arab countries the day is celebrated on March 12. Bangladesh and Bolivia The day is celebrated...
Who Invented the Calendar We Have Today?

Who Invented the Calendar We Have Today?...

Introduction The modern calendar is known as the Gregorian Calendar. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII who favored it over the Julian Calendar. But Gregory XIII only approved the calendar that bears his name. The actual inventor was Alosyius Lilius. Alosyius Lilius Biography Lilius was an Italian astronomer, physician and chronologist. He was from Ziro in Calabrio, Italy. Lilius’ chosen profession was medicine. He studied in Naples to become a doctor and served under the earl Carafa, a prominent nobleman. Some time later, Lilius began to teach in the Perugia University in 1552. Aside from his interest in medicine, Alosyius Lilius was also fascinated by time keeping and calendars. He noted problems with the Julian Calendar, the one that was being used in his time. So he wrote a paper proposing a new calendar system. But it did not get attention until years after his death in 1576. After Alosyius died, his brother Antonio turned over his manuscript to Pope Gregory XIII. The latter put it for review before a council. It was approved after some changes made by another astronomer, Christopher Clavius. In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII issued a papal bull superseding the Julian with the Gregorian Calendar. It was slowly adopted by Christian countries one after the other. Now it is the system used by virtually everyone in the world. Why the Gregorian Calendar Replaced the Julian Calendar Julius Caesar invented the Julian system. All months had either 30 or 31 days, except for February. February or Februalia had 29 or 30 days depending on whether it was a leap year or not. Caesar named one month after himself, July. When Octavian became Roman emperor, he also renamed a month to August, after his new imperial...
Who Invented the American Flag?

Who Invented the American Flag?...

No one knows for certain where the stars and stripes design came from. Popular accounts of the history of the American flag state that Betsy Ross of Philadelphia designed it. In fact, Ross sewed one of the oldest versions of the flag. There’s no evidence she designed it. Early History The US flag has been altered 26 times since its inception. The first official flag recognized by historians is the Grand Union flag which came out on January 1, 1776. It consisted of 13 stripes (alternately white and red). The British Union Jack was situated on the upper left. It was in May of that year that Ross sewed the flag. A year later on June 14, 1777 the US Congress decreed that the flag have 13 stripes with 13 stars. Based on the history of the American flag, it was this design that Capt. Rob Gray used when he sailed in 1787. In 1795 two stars and stripes were added as Kentucky and Vermont became part of the Union. The 1800s In 1818, the number of stars increased to 20 as more territories became part of the US. However it was decided that the stripes would be kept at 13 for the 13 original states. A year later Illinois joined the US. The 1800s would see more and more territories join the country. By the time California joined, the number of stars had risen to 31. A study of the history of the American flag shows that when the Civil War broke out, the number of stars remained the same. Under orders from President Lincoln, the stars indicating all the states were still part of the flag. By 1890, the stars increased to 43 with Washington, North Dakota...
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