Who Invented the Chicken Nugget?

Who Invented the Chicken Nugget?...

Many people love to eat chicken nugget because it is tasty, flavor-rich and delicious. This dish is basically made up of pre-cooked chicken that is minced, battered and breaded. It can be cooked in different ways including deep-fried. However, many love it baked because it is a much healthier way of preparing such delicious treat. No matter how you cook it, it never fails to satisfy the taste even those who are considered as picky eaters. Here is a closer look at this great-tasting dish including who invented the chicken nugget. The Invention of the Chicken Nugget Who invented the chicken nugget? In the 1950s, a Cornell University food science professor named Robert C. Baker invented this tasty dish. It was actually part of his unpatented academic work. The invention was truly an innovative one, which made it possible to make chicken nuggets of various shapes and sizes. Baker lived from December 29, 1921 to March 13, 2006. Additional Information and Other Highly Interesting Details Baker was a member of the prestigious American Poultry Hall of Fame. He grew up in Lansing, New York. In 1943, he graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University. After that, he proceeded to the school’s College of Agriculture, where he finished his major in the branch of botany called pomology. Throughout his academic career as a student at Cornell University, he was able to publish more or less 290 research papers. Of course, one of his major contributions to the school was the Institute of Food Science and Marketing, which he founded some time in 1970. A music band named Paul and Storm decided to pay Baker a tribute with the song entitled “Nugget Man.” In 1997, he was recognized as part...
Who Invented Ice Cream?

Who Invented Ice Cream?

When the weather is hot and humid, it is natural for you to develop a liking for cold drinks and foods like ice cream. Whether taken in a cone or a glass, ice cream is absolutely enjoyable at any time of the day and at any occasion. You can even opt to choose from the different flavors and brands available in the market. With all these things that make ice cream highly favorable to most, have you ever wondered who invented ice cream and started it all? Early References – the Blurry and the Presumed Original Accounts The early makings of ice cream are said to be during the 4th century B.C. But there were also accounts that icehouses existed around 2,000 B.C. and have been used by Mesopotamians to store food. So, were the Mesopotamians the ones who invented ice cream? Who can tell when early similarities can also be traced back then to some Egyptian pharaohs who ordered ice during hot seasons in their places? Truly, the real accounts on where ice cream started may seem hazy. But there are other points in history that had given us a glimpse of how ice cream began. According to history, during the 37 to 68th century A.D., Nero ate a similar sweet ice cream concoction. During Nero’s time, ice was transported to Rome from the mountains to be used for making this sweet dish. The ice was mixed with fruit toppings, and was a favorite dessert in those times. In 618 to 97 A.D., King Tang of China also had a similar method using ice. They made their own ice and milk concoctions – that may be likened to the present-day sherbets. Because of this, the Chinese were believed...
Who Invented Wine?

Who Invented Wine?

Who invented wine? Origin of Wine Wine is a fermented drink, usually made from grapes. It is thought by scholars that it originated in 6,000-3,000 BC between the Nile and the Persian Gulf, in the territories of modern Iran and Georgia. How exactly man invented wine is unknown. But it may have happened by accident when wild yeast fermented the grapes that men stored as food. What is certain is man has known about wine making for a long time. Wall paintings and other archeological evidence prove it. An interesting Persian tale explains the invention of wine as follows: A melancholy princess had a falling out with her father, the king. She tried to kill herself by drinking what she thought was spoiled grape juice. The drink knocked her unconscious, but it didn’t kill her. When the princess woke up, she was in a much happier mood. She resumed drinking the same grape juice and was so amiable that she and her father soon made up. Regardless of the truth of this story, the Persians did make excellent wine. Some of the best varieties of grape today are thought to have evolved from Persia. Over time wine spread throughout the Mediterranean and Europe via trade. The Egyptians imported their grapes from the Phoenicians. They learned to raise white grapes in the fertile region of the Nile delta. The kind of grape used was most likely a white grape called Muscat native to Alexandria. Europe probably got their first taste of wine through the Phoenicians as well. The Phoenicians were a nation of sea-traveling merchants. They helped spread the knowledge of wine making across the Mediterranean and Europe, especially Greece and Rome. Wine played a very special part in religious...
Who Invented Tater Tots?

Who Invented Tater Tots?...

Tater Tots is a trademark used to refer to hash browns that are commercially offered in various countries including the United States. The hash browns are very famous for their small size, cylindrical shape as well as crispiness. The side dishes are popular in New Zealand and Australia as potato pom-poms and potato gems. Some companies that offer variations of the hash browns are Safeway Incorporated and McCain Foods Limited. Popular fast food restaurant Taco Bell sells seasoned tater tots known as the Mexi Nuggets. To know more about the trademark, let us look at the history of the development of tater tots. History Who invented Tater Tots? The delectable hash browns were invented by Ore-Ida in 1953. The food was created when the founders of the company cooked the leftover sliced potatoes. The founders add seasonings in the potatoes and mash the potatoes with the use of a machine with holes. In 1954, the hash browns were launched in the commercial market in the United States. From the 1900s to the 2000s, the Tater Tots that were consumed by Americans was estimated to be 70 million pounds a year. Additional Information and Other Important Details The hash browns are not only popular in the United States, but these are also famous in other countries like Mexico. In the Pacific Northwest, some fast food chains like Senor Frog and Taco Time sell seasoned tater tots known as the Mexi-Fries. Those who live in the Northeast USA can buy seasoned hash browns called potato puffs or jullienes. One of the most popular fast food restaurants in the world, Burger King sells cheesy tots to consumers. The hash browns contain potatoes and melted cheese. To make the appetizers more enticing, the...
Who Invented Burger King?

Who Invented Burger King?...

One of the leading fast food chains in the world today, Burger King is known for its great-tasting, sumptuous and generous servings of high quality hamburgers. Likewise, it serves other types of delicious treats such as salads, milkshakes and French fries. Today, the product offering of this restaurant chain has grown even further, now serving different kinds of fish and chicken dishes. Aside from these things, there are still other important things to find out about this highly successful business including who invented Burger King. The Invention of Burger King Who invented Burger King? Based on reports, the concept behind this popular restaurant chain was invented by business partners David Edgerton and James McLamore. It was established on December 4, 1954 somewhere within the Miami area in Florida. Before Burger King, there was Insta-Burger King, which was established in 1953 by Matthew Burns and Keith J. Kramer in Jacksonville, Florida. One of their trade secrets was the use of Insta-Broiler, which they used in their various franchises. This method of cooking produced an enticing flavor for the burgers. Edgerton and McLamore bought the rights to operate stores in the Miami area. They opened a branch of the Insta-Burger King within a Miami suburb on December 4, 1954. Because of the growing demand, the two entrepreneurs tried to improve their cooking equipment. Instead of continuing the use of Insta-Broiler, they replaced it with flame broiler, which is basically a mechanized gas grill. At some point in time, financial difficulties took its toll on the Insta-Burger King franchise. Edgerton and McLamore grabbed this opportunity to buy the rights of the restaurant chain to operate nationally. After that, they renamed the restaurant chain as Burger King of Miami, which later on became...
Who Invented Bubblegum?

Who Invented Bubblegum?

Have you ever wondered who invented bubblegum? Perhaps, one way or another, you also found yourself thinking of the inventors of the products that most of the people get to enjoy nowadays. Take, for instance, bubblegum. Were you ever curious enough to know who invented bubblegum? If so, have it ever occurred to you that some of the early inventions were results of glorious accidents? Great Ideas Sometimes Results from Non-Intentional Blunders. It was the year 1928 when an accident in the Fleer Chewing Gum Company in Philadelphia took place. Little did the people there know that the blunder was going to come up with something genius that will forever change the notion of the world towards chewing gum. Perhaps, Walter E. Diemer, who worked at the company as an accountant for the Philadelphia chewing gum company, had nothing much to do one time that Diemer thought of playing around with gum recipes. According to Diemer, the concoction was supposed to be something else but the result of the mixed brew was otherwise– bubbly, absolutely different, and proved to be less sticky than other recipe results. They also found the new gum recipe to have a sort of resiliency that stretched easily than others. There Was a Need to Check if the Idea Would Work Wonders. Are you aware that great inventors usually start with a great idea and a vision and perseverance to carry it through? Well, that’s what Diemer got. To test the product and how the people would react to it, Diemer brought a five-pound glop of the mixed bubbly brew to a certain grocery store. Sure enough, true to Diemer’s belief, many loved the new recipe! And the new bubble gum product was sold out...
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