Who Invented Bacon?

Who Invented Bacon?

A look at the history of bacon reveal that the word is likely derived from three sources. The French word bako, the Germanic word bakkon or Old Teutonic backe. All the words mean “back” in English, which is where bacon cuts are usually taken from. In the US the cut is from the pork belly. History During the Middle Ages bacon (or bacoun) was used to describe pork in general. It was around the 12th century that the phrase “bring home the bacon” originated. Legend says that a church in Dunmow, England promised to give bacon to any man who could swear to the church and God he hadn’t argued with his wife for a year. Thus, the man that was able to bring the bacon home to his wife was held to be a good individual. Whether this is really part of the history of bacon or not is uncertain. However the phrase has struck. The British and the Bacon By the 17th century, bacon had come to refer to the pork’s side cured with salt and not to pork in general. The Oxford Companion to Food refers to bacon as a product of the UK. Other accounts state that bacon wasn’t solely a British product. However the British system for making them was used in other countries. Other accounts say that preserved pork were part of the British diet for hundreds of years. By the 18th century, production of bacon in Britain had become widespread. According to some accounts of the history of bacon, John Harris of Wiltshire set up one of the first bacon curing shops in the country. The place has certainly become known for its production of bacon. Other Accounts Some claims that the...
Who Invented Chocolate?

Who Invented Chocolate?

Do you know who invented chocolate? Have you ever wondered how this sweet concoction in many cookies, cakes, and its own sweet variations really started? The Cacao (Cocoa) Beans Dating back to 1500 BC, during those early Mesoamerican civilizations, Olmec Indians grew cacao beans. Perhaps, from this info, you would think that this was the first taste of chocolate in those times. Were the Indians the ones who invented chocolate? Actually, according to history, it was the Mayans and the Aztecs who developed these beans into chocolate drinks. Aside from the Indians, these groups were also known to grow these beans. Another historical figure that you may want to thank is Christopher Columbus. In the early 1500s, Columbus brought those cocoa beans to Europe. During that time, chocolate drinks spread throughout Spain. But it didn’t become an instant hit in other parts of Europe immediately. It took a hundred years later before people from various regions in Europe tasted the drinks. Progress and Popularity A Frenchman opened a shop that served as London’s first chololate house in 1657. It was named The Coffee Mill and Tobacco Roll. Since the cost for the the chocolate beverage was too expensive, loyal patrons of the shop were merely from the upper class of society. In 1674, chocolate was used for another type of business. It became a main ingredient in making cakes and rolls. But the progress of chocolate didn’t stop there. Monsieur Dubuisson of France took its popularity another notch higher. This was clearly achieved in those days when Dubuisson invented a table mill in 1732 which was known to help grind chocolate. Another invention by Joseph Fry of England also made chocolate gain more popularity. Fry’s invention created another milestone...
Who Invented Coffee?

Who Invented Coffee?

Coffee is undeniably one of the most popular beverages today, which can be served both hot and cold. It is rich in caffeine, an ingredient known for its invigorating effects. It is produced widely in countries such as Colombia, Vietnam and Brazil. Aside from these valuable details, it is nice to know other interesting things about this special beverage including who invented coffee. The Invention of Coffee Who invented coffee? Based on historical accounts, the Ethiopians were the first to discover the ability of the coffee bean plant to energize human beings. Highlanders started to cultivate beans way back to the ninth century. When the Arabs decided to expand their trade, the beans have reached other places such as Yemen and North Africa. At that time, no one can stop the popularity of coffee, which then expanded to the European and Indian markets. Additional Facts and Other Important Information In 1587, Abd al-Qadir al-Jaziri compiled in his work entitled “Umdat al safwa fi hill al-qahwa” the different legal controversies as well as the history of coffee. Based on that particular work, a certain sheik named Jamal-al-Din al-Dhabhani was the very first individual who adopted coffee in the Muslim world. The beverage was widely used by the Sufis during that time in order to drive away sleep. From Yemen as the starting point, coffee found its way to Yemen as export. In 1554, the very first coffeehouse started somewhere in Istanbul. During that time, the beverage was not received well by the people. In fact, the conservative people during that period banned the drink in many places mainly because of its stimulating effect. In 1524, Ottoman Turkish Sultan Selim-I lifted the ban on coffee. From the Ottoman Empire, coffee reached...
Who Invented Bubblegum?

Who Invented Bubblegum?

Have you ever wondered who invented bubblegum? Perhaps, one way or another, you also found yourself thinking of the inventors of the products that most of the people get to enjoy nowadays. Take, for instance, bubblegum. Were you ever curious enough to know who invented bubblegum? If so, have it ever occurred to you that some of the early inventions were results of glorious accidents? Great Ideas Sometimes Results from Non-Intentional Blunders. It was the year 1928 when an accident in the Fleer Chewing Gum Company in Philadelphia took place. Little did the people there know that the blunder was going to come up with something genius that will forever change the notion of the world towards chewing gum. Perhaps, Walter E. Diemer, who worked at the company as an accountant for the Philadelphia chewing gum company, had nothing much to do one time that Diemer thought of playing around with gum recipes. According to Diemer, the concoction was supposed to be something else but the result of the mixed brew was otherwise– bubbly, absolutely different, and proved to be less sticky than other recipe results. They also found the new gum recipe to have a sort of resiliency that stretched easily than others. There Was a Need to Check if the Idea Would Work Wonders. Are you aware that great inventors usually start with a great idea and a vision and perseverance to carry it through? Well, that’s what Diemer got. To test the product and how the people would react to it, Diemer brought a five-pound glop of the mixed bubbly brew to a certain grocery store. Sure enough, true to Diemer’s belief, many loved the new recipe! And the new bubble gum product was sold out...
Who Invented the Thermos?

Who Invented the Thermos?...

Thermos, also known as vacuum flask, is used primarily to store and preserve the hotness of liquid. With the help of this device, you can easily enjoy cups of coffee, tea or other hot beverages almost anytime and anywhere. For years, it has become one of the highly important appliances in many homes all over the world. Aside from these facts, it is also good to know its history including who invented the thermos. The Invention of the Thermos Who invented the thermos? In 1892, Scottish chemist and physicist James Dewar invented the vacuum flask, which is also known today as the thermos. At some point, it was also referred to as Dewar flask. In 1904, Thermos GmbH was founded. The company was credited as the first business to release vacuum flasks commercially. Because of its popularity, people started to refer to vacuum flask as thermos. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Details At the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition, the thermos became the recipient of the Grand Prize Award, thanks to its revolutionary design. In 1911, the first ever machine-made glass filler was produced. In 1923, the company introduced the Thermos Jumbo Jug, which was a big insulated food jar. In 1928, the company came up with an innovative vacuum-insulated Pyrex glass vessel. In 1939, this product played a major role in World War II as the members of the British military forces used thermos as part of their combat gear. It was also used in atomic energy laboratories during that time. In 1957, the popularity of this product reached greater heights. Since then, it has been known commercially all over the world. At that point, it was also used to transport different kinds of important materials like insulin,...
Who Invented the Cheeseburger?

Who Invented the Cheeseburger?...

There seems to be numerous claimants on who invented the cheeseburger. Beginning with the late 18th and early 19th centuries, some forms of hamburgers had already been existing in different countries. It would be interesting to know who pioneered cheeseburgers in their respective places. And also, how they ended up with the kind of cheeseburger people enjoy today. Hamburg Steaks Hamburg steaks became famous in the ports of Hamburg in Germany in the late 18th century. Germany then had the biggest sea ports in Europe. Later on, these burger steaks found themselves sold in America. The earliest burger version, the Hamburg steaks, were not ground beef. They were salted and smoked beef chunks embellished with bread crumbs and onions. So some claim the first cheeseburger maker who invented the cheeseburger was a German. As to who in particular, nothing is mentioned. American Hamburgers European and German immigrants to the US brought with them Hamburg steaks. Later, instead of smoked steaks, they beef was ground and made into patties. They were cooked by frying on flat pans in cooking oil. In 1891 the burgers were put between slices of bread or Oscar Weber Bilby buns and inserted with slices of cheese, lettuce, and onions. American Contributors and Claimants In 1885 Charlie Nagreen sold meatballs in county fairs in Wisconsin. Later he flattened them, placed them between slices of bread and sold them as hamburgers. In Ohio in the same year, Frank and Charles Menches substituted their sausages with ground beef and put them in buns. They sold them in Hamburg, New York in circuses and called them hamburgers. In 1904, Fletch Davis of Texas introduced onions on top of his hamburgers and sold them in his café. However, in 1920...
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