Who Invented Opera?

Who Invented Opera?

The history of opera began in the 1500s in Italy. Jacopo Peri’s Dafne (1598) is widely held to be the first opera ever performed. The Earliest Operas By the 15th century, several new musical instruments had emerged, notably the trumpet. This instrument, along with other ones, changed the face of stage plays considerably. The result was that actors had to belt out their lines or sing along so their voices wouldn’t get drowned out by the music. This innovative approach would gain popularity throughout Europe. The Medici family of Florence was known for being patrons of the arts. Some historians believe that they commissioned Jacopo Peri to compose Dafne in 1598. In the history of opera, this play is often singled out as the first. However some historians bevel opera came about in stages and not via one play. Opera Spreads throughout Europe The impact of Dafne and succeeding plays was immense. The new musical form spread from Italy to France, Germany and the Austrian Empire. With the exception of Italy however, acceptance of opera was limited to the wealthy and aristocratic. Opera took a strong hold in Venice, and it would eventually become the staging ground for some of the finest operas in the continent. Claudio Monteverdi became one of the leading composers of the Renaissance. His inaugural play Orpheo was conducted in 1607. What set him apart from the others was that his plays were designed for everyone. Unlike other operas, his compositions had appeal for both royalty and merchant. This was a significant point in the history of opera. As opera became widespread, two forms emerged, opera seria (dramatic) and opera buffa (comedic). At the same time, stories changed. The storylines became more complex, with symbolism...
Who Invented the Phonograph?

Who Invented the Phonograph?...

The history of the phonograph shows that Thomas Edison filed for the patent in December 1877. But he actually started developing it a few months earlier. The Origin of the Phonograph Edison was actually working on his telegraph. His objective was to make the telegraph send messages again and again. He used papers with some indentations. His design had a diaphragm with a point and set it against paraffin paper. He would later replace the paper with a cylinder enfolded in tin foil. He handed the design to John Kruesi (his mechanic) who created the machine. Edison spoke through it, and his words were recorded. The first words that were used in the history of the phonograph were the nursery rhyme Mary had a Little Lamb. Improvements on the Phonograph A year after getting the patent, the Edison Speaking Phonograph Company was established. The machine became popular although only a few people were able to use it as it was complicated. However Edison didn’t work on the phonograph for a while as he focused on his other inventions. However other inventors would make improvements to his invention. In 1880 Alexander Graham Bell and Charles Tainter replaced the tin foil Edison used with wax. The needle was also replaced with a stylus. In response Edison came out with some improvements on his own model. The history of the phonograph reveal that Edison also used wax but also included stearic wax and ceresin. Edison followed this up in 1890 by releasing talking dolls using the phonograph’s wax cylinders. They came out with some musical cylinders. Nine years later a phonograph parlor was opened. The parlor was located in San Francisco. People would pay a nickel and their selection from the list...
Who Invented the Ferris Wheel?

Who Invented the Ferris Wheel?...

Called by other names such as the big wheel or observation wheel, Ferris wheels are usually found in theme parks and amusement centers. Within this type of non-building structure, people can sit comfortably in passenger gondolas, which are attached to the rim and are set in a huge upright wheel. Today, you can find some of the biggest structures in countries like Japan, the United States as well as Taiwan. Aside from these wonderful details, there are so many other important things to learn about it including who invented the Ferris wheel. The Invention of the Ferris Wheel Who invented the Ferris wheel? The American inventor named George Washington Gale Ferris Jr. designed and invented the Ferris wheel in 1893. It was made for the World’s Columbian Exposition that was held in the City of Chicago in Illinois. It was then called the Chicago Wheel, which he did as part of an effort to build something quite impressive just like the Eiffel Tower in France. After this huge event, every ride of similar nature was referred to as Ferris wheel. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Details The Ferris wheel was the centerpiece at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. It used two steam engines, which stood at the height of 260 feet or 80 meters. After that, it became part of the Saint Louis 1904 World’s Fair. Throughout history, the world has seen different kinds of massive Ferris wheels. After the Chicago Wheel, the Great Wheel was created in 1895 as part of the Empire of India Exhibition that was held Earls Court in London, England. In 1900, the Exposition Universelle was showcased at the Grande Roue de Paris in France, which lasted only until 1937. In 1997, the Tempozan...
Who Invented the Microphone?

Who Invented the Microphone?...

A microphone is an instrument that converts sound waves into electric signals. These signals are then changed back into sound waves in speakers. Microphones are universally employed in media and telecommunications to increase the volume of sound. The word microphone was coined by Sir Charles Wheatstone. But he did not invent it. Biography of the Microphone Inventor The inventor of the microphone was Emile Berliner. He was born in 1851 in Hanover, Germany. At the age of 19 he moved to Washington D.C. where he studied physics. Berliner became fascinated by new developments in audio technology. Specifically the phonograph and telephone. He invented the first microphone for use with the latter. Bell Company bought the patent from him and hired him as well in Boston, Massachusetts. He lived there from 1877 to 1883 when he returned to D.C. Berliner patented the gramophone or phonograph in 1887. It was 6 years after he became an American citizen. His other inventions included a loom and an early prototype of the helicopter. The First Microphone Invented Berliner invented the microphone after seeing the new telephone at work for the first time. Berliner attended the US Centennial Exposition to witness a demonstration of the telephone. He liked it like all the other inventors did. But Berliner noticed the sound quality wasn’t very good. He wondered how he could make it better. In 1876 at the age of 25, Berliner invented the first microphone, which was an improved voice transmitter for the telephone. The microphone amplified the normal human voice through speakers. The owner of the first telephones, Bell Company, was pleased with the invention. Berliner sold the patent to them for a handsome $50,000. His creation became very popular. Other Developments of the...
Who Invented Jazz?

Who Invented Jazz?

Even the most ardent student of the history of jazz will be hard pressed to trace its inventor. Rather than point to a single individual, it’s more accurate to say that the sound emerged from various musical sources. Beginnings of Jazz Music Some accounts state the word jazz was first heard in Chicago. It is unclear where it came or from what it was derived from. Its origins have also been disputed. Some claim the music originated from Africa. This influence can be seen from some common elements found in jazz. These are improvisation, swung note and polyrhythm among others. But most accounts of the history of jazz trace its roots in the 1890s. Black people in America were given the chance to hold jobs. Segregation was still enforced. But they were able to find work as entertainers. Blacks worked at vaudeville, minstrel and other musical shows. Various forms of music remerged including ragtime and the blues. From these and other genres, jazz would come out. The 1900s to 1920s It was during this time that jazz as we know it came into being. It became very popular in New Orleans. Most of the early jazz musicians played in the red light district of New Orleans. One of the earliest known jazz musicians was Buddy Bolden. He began playing in 1900 and is considered by many as the first man of jazz. The 1920s saw the arrival of the phonograph and radio. These two innovations had a tremendous effect on the history of jazz. Once limited to the south, their music was now heard across the country. Bessie Smith became known as the Empress of the Blues and the most well known singer of the 1920s. Other performers during...
Who Invented Rock and Roll?

Who Invented Rock and Roll?...

Exactly when the history of rock and roll began is unclear. The genre itself evolved from the blues, country and other musical styles of the 1930s and 40s. It was disc jock Alan Freed who popularized the phrase in the 1950s. The 1950s It’s not easy to determine what the first rock and roll song actually was but Rocket 88 by Jackie Brenston and the Delta Cars is often mentioned as a top candidate. However it was Bill Haley’s Rock Around the Clock (1955) that topped the charts. With its popularity, rock and roll became widespread. This was followed by a string of hits as new artists emerged in the genre. Bo Diddley’s I’m a Man became a hit in 1955. Little Richard, meanwhile, became one of the first major stars in the history of rock and roll. Among his biggest hits were Long Tall Sally in 1956 and Good Golly Miss Molly (1958). Chuck Berry also broke through with Maybellene in 1955 and also came out with Johnny B Goodie (1958). The biggest rock and roll star was Elvis Presley whose first hit was That’s All Right in 1954. Decline Fro a time rock and roll was the best selling genre in the US. However it declined in the late 1950s and 1960s. There were several factors that led to this. Among them were the deaths of Ritchie Valens and Buddy Holly. Elvis Presley left to join the Army. Little Richard became a preacher and other genres became popular. However this period in the history of rock and roll did not actually mean the genre was dead. The music simply assumed other forms. Emergence of Rock Music While most of the 1960s music charts were dominated by the...
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