Who Invented the Phonograph?

Who Invented the Phonograph?...

The history of the phonograph shows that Thomas Edison filed for the patent in December 1877. But he actually started developing it a few months earlier. The Origin of the Phonograph Edison was actually working on his telegraph. His objective was to make the telegraph send messages again and again. He used papers with some indentations. His design had a diaphragm with a point and set it against paraffin paper. He would later replace the paper with a cylinder enfolded in tin foil. He handed the design to John Kruesi (his mechanic) who created the machine. Edison spoke through it, and his words were recorded. The first words that were used in the history of the phonograph were the nursery rhyme Mary had a Little Lamb. Improvements on the Phonograph A year after getting the patent, the Edison Speaking Phonograph Company was established. The machine became popular although only a few people were able to use it as it was complicated. However Edison didn’t work on the phonograph for a while as he focused on his other inventions. However other inventors would make improvements to his invention. In 1880 Alexander Graham Bell and Charles Tainter replaced the tin foil Edison used with wax. The needle was also replaced with a stylus. In response Edison came out with some improvements on his own model. The history of the phonograph reveal that Edison also used wax but also included stearic wax and ceresin. Edison followed this up in 1890 by releasing talking dolls using the phonograph’s wax cylinders. They came out with some musical cylinders. Nine years later a phonograph parlor was opened. The parlor was located in San Francisco. People would pay a nickel and their selection from the list...
Who Invented Bingo?

Who Invented Bingo?

The invention of Bingo dates back to 1929; although a game similar to it dates back centuries before, which is where bingo originated. This article seeks to investigate the historical facts of Bingo. Bingo is similar to an Italian lottery that was played in the 1530s and was called “Lo Giuoco del Lotto D’Italia”. The game is based more on chance rather than skill. The popularity of the game grew over the years and spread to the French by the late 1770s. In France, the game was called “Le Lotto” and was played among wealthy Frenchmen. A version of the game was played in Germany to help students to learn spelling, math and history in the 1800s. A carnival pitchman, who was on tour in Germany, introduced it to America. It was in 1929 and it was known as “Beano”. He explored the potential for the game as he made some changes to the game he learnt. A New York toy salesman named Edwin S. Lowe visited a carnival in Atlanta, Georgia where he first saw the game being played. The crowd was very curious and quite excited about the game. The game was being played in a tent and it engaged the crowd so much, that the person in charge of the tent had much difficulty ending the game. This was evident when he made attempts to bring the game to close as persons would complain of not having had a chance at the game. It was after much effort that he was successful. Lowe, himself, was not able to play based on the thick crowd. However, upon returning to his hometown in New York, Mr. Lowe introduced the game to friends. The same kind of excitement was...
Who Invented American Idol?

Who Invented American Idol?...

Definitely one of the most highly anticipated shows in the world today, “American Idol” is a reality television show that offers viewers loads of surprises. This interactive talent show is currently on its way to start its ninth season. The show is known for featuring some of the best homegrown talents in the United States. It offers participants a once in a lifetime opportunity to shine and become popular worldwide. Despite its wondrous accomplishments, it is still good to look back and learn the colorful history of the show including who invented American Idol. The Invention of American Idol Who invented American Idol? Led by a group of directors that include Ken Warwick, Nigel Lythgoe and Bruce Gowers, the concept behind this highly interesting show was invented by Simon Fuller. Throughout the years, his name has been associated with some of the huge names in show business such as Annie Lennox, Spice Girls as well as past American Idol winners David Cook and Carrie Underwood. In 1998, he was able to create a format that revolutionized the world of television. Amongst the shows that he made by that time were Canadian Idol, Pop Idol and American Idol. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Information After Fuller’s Pop Idol made some really serious noise in its first two installments in the United Kingdom, he decided to sell the show to the Fox Network in the United States. Upon its release, American Idol was an instant hit among various audiences. After that, the show has popularized show presenters Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson. This particular type of television format that Fuller created has an estimated value of more than $2.5 billion, the revenues of which are comprised of advertising sources,...
Who Invented Strawberry Shortcake?

Who Invented Strawberry Shortcake?...

Strawberry Shortcake is the name of the cute female character licensed and owned by greeting card company American Greetings Corp. It was intended primarily for use in greeting cards. Today, it is also featured in other products such as posters and dolls. Because of the positive response of consumers to this character, manufacturers started to gain interest on it. The product line has been expanded to include the pets as well as friends of the main character. To understand it more, here is a quick look at the person who invented Strawberry Shortcake. The Invention of Strawberry Shortcake Who invented Strawberry Shortcake? While working as illustrator of greeting cards at the Juvenile and Humorous card department of American Greetings, Muriel Fahrion drew the original design of the character. It was done some time in 1977, which included the main character together with her cat named Custard. After that, it was presented to General Mills executive Bernie Loomis, who helped the character become a licensing entity. She then worked for the toy and licensing design division of American Greetings. After Fahrion created Strawberry Shortcake, Janet Jones and Cindy Moyer Patton were assigned to design the other characters. Additional Facts and Other Important Information Besides inventing the Strawberry Shortcake character, Fahrion directed the production of the first doll of the character. Her sister Susan Trentel created the design for the rag doll. The personality profiles of the different characters of t he line are unique and very interesting. The names of the characters carry a dessert or fruity themes. Likewise, the names of their pets also have a dessert or fruity sound. The characters rose to fame some time in 1980s. They were featured in various kinds of things including video...
Who Invented the Electric Guitar?

Who Invented the Electric Guitar?...

Definitely one of the most popular musical instruments today, the electric guitar is widely used by bands and musicians worldwide. It produces an easily distinguishable sound that greatly adds to the overall appeal of any given song. Artists like Santana, Avril Lavigne and Lenny Kravitz are just few of the many music personalities out there that make use of this important musical instrument. For those who are interested to know other things about this type of instrument, it is good to learn who invented the electric guitar. The Invention of the Electric Guitar Who invented the electric guitar? Les Paul, whose real name was Lester Williams Polsfuss, is credited for the invention of the first electric guitar with a solid body. In 1950, the stringed instrument manufacturer Fender released the solid-body electric guitar called the Fender Esquire, which became a commercial success. After that, it went on to become an integral part of numerous music styles like rockabilly, early rock and roll as well as Chicago blues. Likewise, it played a huge role in the development of blues-rock in the 1960s. Additionally, it also contributed to the flourishing of other musical genres including contemporary classic, new age and country music. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Details Some time in the 1930s and the 1940s, the demand for amplified guitars flourished as the jazz orchestras during that period expanded even more. Because of that huge demand for such musical instruments during that time, electronic enthusiasts, guitar makers and manufacturers tried to create various designs. One of them was Les Paul, who came up with the idea of attaching microphones right onto guitars. Earlier models came with a hollow-bodied acoustic design. The electric guitar is comprised of many different parts and...
Who Invented the Overhead Projector?

Who Invented the Overhead Projector?...

The history of the overhead projector points to Roger Appledorn as its inventor. He created the device in the 1960s, but the basic concept was already known and used years before. The Beginnings of the Overhead Projector The earliest known device comparable to the overhead projector was the episcope which came out in the early 1900s. The projector directs light on the object. Several lenses would be used to place the image on a screen. However it was difficult to setup and usage was limited. It was not until the 1940s that the idea was put to practical use. The US military developed a device similar to the projector. The design involved using the slide projectors to put images on a screen. Other devices used in the early history of the overhead projector were cellophane rolls set on a 9 inch stage. This process allowed facial traits to be set on the stage. The 1950s to the 1980s During the 1950s there were projector-like devices being narketed. Buhl Industries was one of the first to market these machines, but it was Apledorn’s work that set the standard. He was working at 3M in the Thermal Fax section. The company wasn’t too keen on his invention. The chalkboard was commonplace and his superiors believed that the projector was simply going to duplicate its work. However, Appledorn and some of his colleagues saw the device’s potential. They started giving demonstrations of the device to school administrators. In a short span of time, the device became popular. The history of the overhead projector shows that it gained high acceptance particularly in classrooms. By the 1980s, the projectors had become widespread. It was used not just in universities but also in business offices....
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