Who Invented the Violin?

Who Invented the Violin?...

The violin belongs to a family of stringed instruments, which also include the cello and viola. Among these three, it is the highest-pitched and smallest. More importantly, it is used widely in the different musical genres including rock and roll, pop punk as well as folk music. Likewise, it is also played as part of jazz, classical and Baroque music. In addition to these interesting things, it is also good to know something about its history, particularly who invented the violin. The Invention of the Violin Who invented the violin? Renowned violinmaker Andrea Amati constructed the very first violin sometime in 1555. Before that, there was a violin-like instrument called violetta, which only had three strings instead of the usual four strings that are found in modern-day violins. Because of the nice pleasant sound that it produced, the King of France Charles IX ordered him to manufacture 24 pieces of the instrument. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Details By the 18th century, the original design of the violin underwent a number of significant changes. After that, the violin featured a heavier brass bar. The most expensive violin ever sold was a Stradivari violin, which was auctioned for the price of $3,544,000. Whey using a violin, there are several bowing techniques available like the martele, which is done through sudden and forceful bow strokes. Another technique is called col legno, which is done by drawing the stick across the strings rather than the hair. To execute a pizzicato, a player must use the fingers of his or her right hand to pluck the strings instead of the bow. To perform a mute, a small device referred to as mute is necessary. This apparatus is usually made from wood, rubber or...
Who Invented Opera?

Who Invented Opera?

The history of opera began in the 1500s in Italy. Jacopo Peri’s Dafne (1598) is widely held to be the first opera ever performed. The Earliest Operas By the 15th century, several new musical instruments had emerged, notably the trumpet. This instrument, along with other ones, changed the face of stage plays considerably. The result was that actors had to belt out their lines or sing along so their voices wouldn’t get drowned out by the music. This innovative approach would gain popularity throughout Europe. The Medici family of Florence was known for being patrons of the arts. Some historians believe that they commissioned Jacopo Peri to compose Dafne in 1598. In the history of opera, this play is often singled out as the first. However some historians bevel opera came about in stages and not via one play. Opera Spreads throughout Europe The impact of Dafne and succeeding plays was immense. The new musical form spread from Italy to France, Germany and the Austrian Empire. With the exception of Italy however, acceptance of opera was limited to the wealthy and aristocratic. Opera took a strong hold in Venice, and it would eventually become the staging ground for some of the finest operas in the continent. Claudio Monteverdi became one of the leading composers of the Renaissance. His inaugural play Orpheo was conducted in 1607. What set him apart from the others was that his plays were designed for everyone. Unlike other operas, his compositions had appeal for both royalty and merchant. This was a significant point in the history of opera. As opera became widespread, two forms emerged, opera seria (dramatic) and opera buffa (comedic). At the same time, stories changed. The storylines became more complex, with symbolism...
Who Invented the Strawberry Shortcake Doll?

Who Invented the Strawberry Shortcake Doll?...

Do you remember those cute dolls from the 80s with a dessert-themed name and clothing to match? Those were days the Strawberry Shortcake doll rose in popularity. But who invented the Strawberry Shortcake doll anyway? And who thought of even creating some of the doll’s friends and pets? A Cartoon Character Born in the Greeting Card Department If you’re thinking that the original creations started with the making of the dolls, that was not actually what happened then. You see, before the days Strawberry Shortcake was manufactured as a doll, it was Muriel Fahrion who invented the Strawberry Shortcake doll’s original design together with the character’s cat named Custard. This was done in 1977 when Fahrion worked at American Greetings at the Juvenile and Humorous card department as an illustrator for greeting cards. This design was shown to Bernie Loomis who was working in General Mills. After that, the design was granted as a licensing entity and Fahrion went on to creating more characters for American Greetings. The other characters included in the Strawberry Shortcake collection later emerged when Cindy Moyer Patton and Janet Jones collaborated in designing more characters to add with the original design of Strawberry Shortcake. A story line, profiles on each character’s personality, and a common philosophy was then added by the editor, Lyn Edwards and the American Greetings’ group. Delicious Names that Anyone can Remember The Strawberry Shortcake line of characters all had particular names resembling delicious desserts. They also come with their own fruit- or dessert-named pet. It would be easy to remember the names of the characters since the cartoon characters wore appropriate clothing to match. The hair of the all the charaters was also scented with their own paricular dessert-themed names....
Who Invented the IMAX?

Who Invented the IMAX?

Completely referred to as Image MAXimum but better known as IMAX, this film format is a projection standard and movie format developed by IMAX Corp. of Canada. It offers a number of advantages including higher picture resolution as well as greater size compared to conventional film systems. The size of the screen usually varies, but the basic measurement for this format is usually 53 feet or 16.1 meters high and 72 feet or 22 meters wide. Aside from these interesting details, there are other nice things to learn about it including who invented the IMAX. The Invention of the IMAX System Who invented the IMAX? A number of people developed the IMAX system, namely William C. Shaw, Nicholas Mulders, Roman Kroiter and Graeme Ferguson. Before that, there were numerous attempts to improve the visual impact of movies. The very first one was in 1929, when Fox developed the 70mm format called Fox Grandeur. After that, many efforts soon followed including the VistaVision in 1954 and the CinemaScope in 1953. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Details The very first IMAX film was entitled “Tiger Child,” which became part of Expo ’70 that was held in Osaka, Japan. In 1971, the IMAX system was installed permanently at the amusement entertainment park called Ontario Place in Toronto. In the United States, a huge IMAX screen was used at the Expo ’74 in Spokane, Washington. In 1973, a permanent IMAX Dome was installed at the Reuben H. Fleet Space Theater and Science Center within Balboa Park in San Diego California. Meanwhile, a permanent IMAX 3D theater was featured at Expo ’86 held in Vancouver, British Columbia. Today, there are numerous IMAX systems installed all throughout the world. Some of these include the IMAX...
Who Invented Pong?

Who Invented Pong?

One of the earliest forms of arcade video games, Pong is a two-dimensional tennis game. The primary aim of the game is to beat opponents by scoring higher. Released in 1972, this important development eventually led to a boom in the video game industry. With its rich and colorful history, it is but great to take a quick look at the start of this early video game form including who invented Pong. The Invention of Pong Who invented Pong? A computer scientist named Allan Alcorn invented this arcade video game. Atari Inc. released it sometime in 1972. Atari founder Nolan Bushnell assigned this task to Alcorn as a training exercise. According to Bushnell, the main idea behind the game was based on the electronic ping-pong game of the first-ever home videogame console called Magnavox Odyssey. Additional Facts and Other Important Details After the success of Pong, there seemed to be no turning back for the video game industry. Numerous efforts to copy the game play followed. In response, Atari asked its employees to conceptualize other innovative games. In December 1975, the home version of the game was launched in various Sears retail stores. The Pong arcade games were without a doubt a commercial success. Furthermore, the home version of the game earned solid revenues that were approximately four times more than the coin-operated arcade machines. In 1973, Atari delivered 2,500 units. In 1974, it sold more than 8,000 video game consoles. In 1975, the company launched a special limited release of Home Pong, which eventually sold more or less 150,000 units for that particular Christmas season alone. Many game experts believed that the arcade phenomenon during that time was attributed mainly to the success of this video game. In...
Who Invented Bingo?

Who Invented Bingo?

The invention of Bingo dates back to 1929; although a game similar to it dates back centuries before, which is where bingo originated. This article seeks to investigate the historical facts of Bingo. Bingo is similar to an Italian lottery that was played in the 1530s and was called “Lo Giuoco del Lotto D’Italia”. The game is based more on chance rather than skill. The popularity of the game grew over the years and spread to the French by the late 1770s. In France, the game was called “Le Lotto” and was played among wealthy Frenchmen. A version of the game was played in Germany to help students to learn spelling, math and history in the 1800s. A carnival pitchman, who was on tour in Germany, introduced it to America. It was in 1929 and it was known as “Beano”. He explored the potential for the game as he made some changes to the game he learnt. A New York toy salesman named Edwin S. Lowe visited a carnival in Atlanta, Georgia where he first saw the game being played. The crowd was very curious and quite excited about the game. The game was being played in a tent and it engaged the crowd so much, that the person in charge of the tent had much difficulty ending the game. This was evident when he made attempts to bring the game to close as persons would complain of not having had a chance at the game. It was after much effort that he was successful. Lowe, himself, was not able to play based on the thick crowd. However, upon returning to his hometown in New York, Mr. Lowe introduced the game to friends. The same kind of excitement was...
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