Who Invented the word Blog?

Who Invented the word Blog?...

Who invented the word “blog”? Introduction Blog is short for weblog. The term weblog was first coined in December 1997 by an American blogger named Jorn Barger. He used it to describe he would “log the web” as he surfed online. Later another blogger named Peter Merholz changed weblog to “we blog” in a 1999 post. Soon people were dropping the other word and just used “blog.” Jorn Barger Biography Jorn Barger was born in Yellow Springs, Ohio in the year 1953. He was the editor of “Robot Wisdom,” a widely read blog from the early days of blogging. Barger liked to blog about the Irish writer James Joyce and artificial intelligence. He participated heavily in Usenet newsgroups in the 1990s, writing about Joyce, Kate Bush and other topics. He came up with a newsgroups “law” stating that the more interesting one’s own life is, the less he or she posts in online discussions. Barger created the Robot Wisdom weblog posting links about politics, technology, internet culture, books, artificial intelligence and other subjects. It became an online journal recording his day to day intellectual and reading activities. Barger’s blog gained wide acclaim. The influential New York Times remarked that the Robot Wisdom made life easier for people. With the blog, one could gain quick access to quality information without having to search the web by oneself. The Register praised Barger as well, saying no one could read news better than he. However the blog pioneer is not without critics. He has come under fire several times for allegedly racist comments against the Jews and Judaism. Blog Basics Blogs have gone from being simple web journals to big business. There are several types of blogs, such as: Personal blogs –...
Who Invented the MP3 Format?

Who Invented the MP3 Format?...

The mp3 format was invented by the MPEG Group in 1991. The history of the mp3 format indicates several people worked on the project but the accredited inventors were Ernst Eberlein, Thomas Sporer, Karhl Heinz Brandenburg, Bern Grill and Bernd Kurten. Development Mp3 was the offshoot of OCF and PXFM. Those who worked on the project were mainly focused on how people were able to hear music. Through the course of their work, the Fraunhofer Society (which became part of the MPEG group) started looking for ways for music to be compressed and yet maintain its high quality. After working on it for several yeas, the standards were implemented in 1991. Further refinements would follow and it was integrated with MPEG 2 which came out in 1994. Release to the Public A study of the history of the mp3 format will reveal the Fraunhofer Society produced the encoder on July 7, 1994. A few months after its release, an mp3 player called Winplay 3 was released as well. Unlike other music formats, Mp3 offered a lot of advantages. The first was its small size. Using the 128 bit compression, a 5 minute song only came in at about 5 MB. This was a huge improvement over the WAV formats whose size was ten times that. In addition, the quality was very high, almost CD like. This became possible due to limitations in hearing. Mp3 removed the bits in the sound file that people wouldn’t be able to hear. By taking out these extraneous pieces, the size was reduced without sacrificing the sound quality. Popularity and Widespread Use Through the 1990s, the history of the mp3 format shows the tremendous impact it made on the Net. The release of Winamp...
Who Invented the Mouse?

Who Invented the Mouse?

The origin and history of the mouse began in 1964. That was the year Douglas Engelbart invented the first mouse prototype. He actually started working on the device the year before. He got the patent in 1970. The First Mouse In 1964, Engelbart showed the mouse to his colleagues at STI (Stanford Research Institute) and how the device was used. He utilized it on a computer with a graphical user interface (GUI). His prototype mouse had a wooden shell. It also came with a couple of wheels which helped it move around. When Engelbart applied for the patent, he called it the “X Y position indicator for a display system”. But the history of the mouse shows that the name was used early on. According to Engelbart he called it the mouse because the shape and tail made it look like one. Note: the GUI and windows that Engelbart used were also his inventions. But he couldn’t patent them because computer program patents weren’t available yet. Innovations in Mouse Design In 1972 Bill English (who helped Engelbart make the mouse) created the ball mouse. English was working at Xerox at the time and his invention became part of the Xerox Alto computer. The ball mouse was easier to use than the wheeled mouse. Unlike the latter, the device could be moved in any direction with ease. In the history of the mouse, this innovation is considered as one of the major ones. Over time, the ball mouse became the most popular version of the device. By the 1980s and the 1990s, the ball had become a standard feature in almost all mice sold. Based on English’s design, other types of ball mice emerged. Among the innovators and inventors were...
Who Invented the Internet?

Who Invented the Internet?...

The Internet was not created by a single individual. If you assess the history of the Internet, it will reveal that it was the product of different ideas and concepts that merged together. Origin of the Internet The basic ideas for the Internet came in 1957. The US Defense Department created the ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency). Its purpose was to produce technologies that the military could use. In the 1960s ARPA and MIT (Massachusetts institute of technology) corroborated to share information and technology. They would do this by joining networks using phones. In 1966, Larry Roberts (from the MIT) introduced the ARPANET, which consisted of computers linked over long distances. The history of the Internet was also affected by packet switching, a technology that allowed for faster and cost effective data transmissions. In 1969, universities were allowed to be a part of the network nodes. UCLA and Standard were among the early ones. By 1971, several more universities were included. By 1973, ARPANET had also established a node in London, England. The 1970s Several milestones were attained in the 1970s. TCP (Transmission Control Program) was developed and made data transfer easier. Unix was also developed in 1976 and the same year email was used for the first time by the Queen of England. The history of the Internet in the 70s was also marked by the birth of USENET. This would be the model upon which all discussion groups and forums would be modeled. The 1980s and 1990s The development of the TCP/IP (Transmission Protocol and Internet Protocol) in 1982 is one of the earliest references to the word Internet itself. In 1985 symbolics.com became the initial domain name to be registered. It was in 1988 that the...
Who Invented Email?

Who Invented Email?

The history of email began with Ray Tomlinson in 1971. The program was created while he was working for the US government, specifically ARPANET (the future Internet). Tomlinson’s Work Tomlinson was working for the United States Defense Department in 1968. He was a computer engineer at the time. He started by developing an application called SNDMSG. Its purpose was to let ARPANET users relay messages. Originally, SNDMSG was local. That is, the messages could be sent only to users of that same computer. Tomlinson used the CYPNET (a transfer protocol) on the SNDMSG application. This allowed SNDMSG to send and receive email to any computer within the ARPANET network. This was how the history of email began. The First Email Message Tomlinson utilized the @ symbol for a simple reason: it would enable him to know which individual was at the system. Back them, the @ was inserted between the computer host and the user name. The first email Tomlinson sent was QWERTYUIOP. Early Use of Email Following Tomlinson’s invention, the service started to be used in the ARPANET. It was connected to the FTP (File Transfer Protocol). The FTP would eventually be replaced by the SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol). FTP is still sometimes used today when downloading files off the World Wide Web. However it is important to note that email is much older than the Internet. Email was being used at ARPANET in the 1970s, long before the Net came into being. Other Email Prototypes The history of email shows that MIT had already demonstrated its potential back in 1961 with Compatible Time Sharing System (CTSS). This technology permitted users to gather and share files online. The other prototypes permitted communication on the mainframe. However it...
Who Invented the Computer Mouse?

Who Invented the Computer Mouse?...

The mouse was invented by Douglas Engelbart in 1965 while working at the Stanford Research Institute. He was also helped by his colleague Bill English. The history of the computer mouse shows he never profited from it. The patent had expired long before the device came into wide usage. Early Prototypes Before Engelbart developed the mouse, the trackball had already been invented. In 1954, the Canadian Navy created the device for utilization on the DATAR system. The mouse Engelbart made was large and had two wheels. Although he invented the mouse in 1965, he only patented it in 1970. He called the device an XY Position Indicator for a Display System. The basic idea was actually inspired by the telautograph which was designed back in the 19th century. A couple of years later (1972) Bill English created the ball mouse. This was an improvement from the original and marked a significant point in the history of the computer mouse. Unlike the mouse with wheels, the ball allowed the mouse to move in any direction. The device was included in the Xerox computer where English was working at the time. Other Mouse Types In 1975, another type of ball mouse was created by Jack Hawley also while working at Xerox. Honeywell later produced a wheeled mouse which moved along its axes. However it was in the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne that the standard mouse appeared. The project was headed by André Guignard and Professor Jean-Daniel Nicoud. Their design would change the history of the computer mouse. They changed the rubber ball so that it became harder and more stable. They also increased the buttons to three. This would remain the standard until the mid 1990s when the third button...
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