Who Invented Paper?

Who Invented Paper?

The word “paper” came from the word “papyrus.” Papyrus was a plant abundant in Egypt. However, the acknowledged inventor of paper was a Chinese. So remember, as far as who invented paper is concerned, according to recorded history, the answer is a Chinese. The account below is how paper began. T’sai Lun Of China is the Winner! About 105 A.D. (some say 2000 years ago), there was a man from Lei-Yang, China named T’sai Lun. He was a courtier. He separated the fibers of huge wet mush. Paper is a mixture of pulped wood fibers and cotton or flax. They are pressed together then dried under the sun. That was what he did. That was how paper began. He spread it on a cloth mat framed with bamboo. After the sun had dried up the fiber mixture a new product emerged—paper. Thus, it is a by-product of other materials. But Paper is not Papyrus T’sai Lun may have had competitors in Egypt before for the title of who invented paper. But after careful weighing of facts, it was unanimously decided that he was really the one who invented paper. The papyrus that the Egyptians used was not really paper; it was more the bark of a plant, a raw unprocessed material. Paper, by definition, is a processed material derived from several raw materials. So the first man on earth who came up with the brilliant idea of inventing paper was T’sai Lun. Earlier Records of Writing Materials To be sure, man had been using writing materials long before T’sai Lun invented paper. As in the case of other inventions, he developed other people’s works. Man first wrote on rocks, on cave walls, on wood, on stone tablets or wet...
Who Invented the Train?

Who Invented the Train?

The history of the train will show that Richard Trevithick made the first steam tramway locomotive in 1804. In 1814, George Stephenson created the Blucher, the first steam locomotive meant for railway use. Early History of Railways Records show that as far back as 1550, the Germans had already built rails. However these were called wagonways and constructed of wood. By 1776, the wood rails had been replaced by iron. Instead of horses, wheels were now used to push the charts. Eventually these wagonways became tramways. It wasn’t long before it spread throughout Europe. In 1789 William Jessop of the UK created a wagon with flanged wheels. This was crucial in the history of the train; the design allowed the wheels to move securely along the rails. The Invention of the Steam Engine As stated, it was Trevithick who built the tramway steam locomotive. It was first run on February 22, 1804. The machine was able to carry a 10 ton load. The load consisted of 70 people, some wagons and iron pieces. It traveled 9 miles, which took two hours. This took place in South Wales. Stephenson’s invention came soon after. He had a great role in adoption and further development of the steam locomotive. In 1825, Stockton & Darlington Railroad Company began carrying people and merchandise. They were also the first to have train rides on a regular schedule. Their locomotives were based on the work of Stephenson. It was able to carry about 450 people at 9 mph. Railways in the United States Colonel John Stevens is considered to be the founder of American railways and railroads. In 1826 he showed it was possible for locomotives to move around circular rails. In 1815 he was given...
Who Invented the Internet?

Who Invented the Internet?...

The Internet was not created by a single individual. If you assess the history of the Internet, it will reveal that it was the product of different ideas and concepts that merged together. Origin of the Internet The basic ideas for the Internet came in 1957. The US Defense Department created the ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency). Its purpose was to produce technologies that the military could use. In the 1960s ARPA and MIT (Massachusetts institute of technology) corroborated to share information and technology. They would do this by joining networks using phones. In 1966, Larry Roberts (from the MIT) introduced the ARPANET, which consisted of computers linked over long distances. The history of the Internet was also affected by packet switching, a technology that allowed for faster and cost effective data transmissions. In 1969, universities were allowed to be a part of the network nodes. UCLA and Standard were among the early ones. By 1971, several more universities were included. By 1973, ARPANET had also established a node in London, England. The 1970s Several milestones were attained in the 1970s. TCP (Transmission Control Program) was developed and made data transfer easier. Unix was also developed in 1976 and the same year email was used for the first time by the Queen of England. The history of the Internet in the 70s was also marked by the birth of USENET. This would be the model upon which all discussion groups and forums would be modeled. The 1980s and 1990s The development of the TCP/IP (Transmission Protocol and Internet Protocol) in 1982 is one of the earliest references to the word Internet itself. In 1985 symbolics.com became the initial domain name to be registered. It was in 1988 that the...
Who Invented the York Peppermint Patty?

Who Invented the York Peppermint Patty?...

Known as one of the tastiest chocolate candies manufactured by Hershey Foods Corporation, the York Peppermint Patty is originally licensed under Peter-Paul. This chocolate treat is very popular in the U.S. that it was introduced in other countries. Because of the unique taste of this candy, other confectionery manufacturers are interested in knowing the recipe used by Hershey to produce the product. To learn more about this item, it is best to know who conceptualized the creation of this merchandise. History of the Chocolate Candy Who invented the York Peppermint Patty? The chocolate candy was invented by Henry C. Kessler in 1940 for the York Cone Company. The product was first launched at the Northeastern states of the U.S., which include Indiana, Ohio as well as Florida. The merchandise became popular and Peter-Paul was interested in manufacturing the item. In 1972, Peter-Paul acquired York Cone Company and got the right to produce the chocolate candy. Three years after the acquisition, the firm decided to introduce the merchandise in the other states of the country. A merger between Cadbury Schweppes and Peter-Paul happened in 1978. The right to produce the chocolate was transferred to Hershey Corp. in 1988 when the firm acquired the confectionery division of Cadbury in the United States. The original version of the York Peppermint Patty was crisp and firm. The merchandise became famous at the time that it was launched because other chocolate candies are gummy and soft. However, to enhance the sales from the item, the company launched variants of the candy. One of the most special and sweetest variations of the product is the Peppermint Patties Miniature Hearts, which is commonly produced for Valentine’s Day. Most of the variants of the product were produced...
Who Invented Toilet Paper?

Who Invented Toilet Paper?...

Toilet paper is such a common thing that anyone can see every single day. It is so commonplace that people often take it for granted or even wonder who invented toilet paper. Toilet paper is actually different from facial competition when you compare their composition. It is actually designed to decompose once it reaches a septic tank. This might be its really distinct feature when compared to bathroom tissues and facial tissues. Among the many peoples of the world, the toilet paper takes on various names. Several common names for today’s toilet paper include toilet roll, loo roll, loo paper, dunny paper, dunny roll, toilet tissue, bathroom tissue, and TP. Early Origin Those who wonder who invented toilet paper will be astonished to find out that its origin really dates back to the second century BC. It was already around in China but was used as a padding material or used for wrapping. It is known that it was first used in world history in the 6th century AD. Early Chinese writers made mention of toilet paper in their works as early as 589 AD. Yan Zhitui wrote about it in 589 AD in his works. In 851 AD, it is known that a Muslim traveler traveling to China commented about the people’s cleanliness mentioning the use of paper instead of water. It is recorded that ten million packages of toilet paper was manufactured annually in the Yuan Dynasty. Each package had about a thousand to ten thousand sheets of toilet paper. Another mass production was recorded during the Ming Dynasty. It is found that there were more than 700,000 sheets were manufactured. It was intended for general use within the imperial court. With the said records it is...
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