Who Invented the Smoke Detector?

Who Invented the Smoke Detector?...

The history of smoke detectors started with American inventor Francis Robbins Upton. He created the first fire alarm in 1890. The patent no. was 436,961. He was a colleague of Thomas Edison but there’s evidence Edison worked on the device. Other Smoke Detectors Upton’s invention was very basic and other models would appear. The next one appeared by accident. In 1930. Swiss physicist Walter Jaeger was trying to make a sensor for poisonous gas. He was hoping that the gas would go in the sensor and ionize air. But the gas didn’t alter any currents. Jaeger lit a cigarette and saw the meter current go down. Jaeger’s discovery that smoke would affect the sensors changed the history of smoke detectors and how they were made. The Emergence of Home Smoke Detectors But these devices hardly made an impact. Electronic equipment made manufacturing very expensive. It wasn’t until the mid 1960s that affordable smoke alarms could be made. The few smoke detectors that were available were so expensive only large companies bothered to install them. The first home detectors were made by  Duane Pearsall in 1965. Their model made use of batteries. The design made it easy for homeowners to replace them. In 1975 Peterson and Pearsall began manufacturing smoke detectors. Their company Statitrol Corp was the first in the history of smoke detectors to sell the products. These models were comprised of metal and resistant to fire. The battery was made by Gates Energy. It didn’t take long before the rechargeable batteries were replaced by double A batteries. The devices proved very successful. By 1977, the company was shipping 500 units daily. In 1980, Statitrol sold its invention rights to Emerson Electrics. Sears would end up selling the product....
Who Invented Candy?

Who Invented Candy?

Because there are many types of candy, no one person can be singled out as the inventor. Scholars studying the history of candy are also in disagreement as to when and where it originated. The Earliest Candies The word candy came from the Persian word qandi. However the candy is much older than the Persians. Remember that candy refers to any confection combined with sugar, honey or other sweets. Using this definition, the earliest candies can be traced back to ancient Egypt. Archeologists have uncovered 2,000 year old papyri depicting candies. These illustrations show the sweets made from honey and other ingredients. These were usually heated and cooked in ovens. The Romans and Chinese ate barley sugar candies. Experts on the history of candy state that the Romans, Greeks and Chinese indulged in it along with sesame seeds. During the Middle Ages, sugar candies became quite popular. The candy was categorized as a drug though and sold as such. Candies were also exclusively for the rich as the price of sugar was very high. Aside from sugar, candy was also made by combining sugar and honey with nuts. Fruit candies were made by combining fruits with sugar and sweets. In 1519, cacao was invented in Mexico. Cacao was uncovered by the Spaniards in the country and brought it back to Europe. 1700 to 1800s The history of candy and its development really took off in the 1700s. The cost of sugar went down and machinery was becoming commonplace. These twin developments made it easier to mass manufacture the confection. Such was the popularity of candies that there were hundreds of factories in the US by the 1850s. In 1854, Whitman’s chocolate came out and in 1880, the candy corn...
Who Invented Gunpowder?

Who Invented Gunpowder?

There is really no way to tell who invented gunpowder. Like a lot of the ancient inventions we enjoy today, gunpowder came about and was developed gradually through years of testing, use, and perfection. It is interesting that we can trace its origin several centuries into the past. In fact, you can trace the origin of gunpowder into the early days of ancient China. Early Origins Though we don’t know who invented gunpowder exactly we can find many people who have written about it and having it mentioned in their annals. One of the earliest records that mention anything like gunpowder dates back to 142 AD during China’s Han Dynasty. Wei Boyang is the first to have written something that described something like it. He wrote about a certain mixture that is made from three powders that dance and fly violently. Though he did not mention the word gunpowder what he describes is exactly what gunpowder is. We know that gunpowder is an explosive that does contain three foundational ingredients. We can thus surmise that the person who invented gunpowder lived prior to Boyang’s writing. Ge Hong, a scientist who lived during China’s Chin Dynasty around 300 AD wrote down the ingredients of gunpowder. Though having mentioned the ingredients he is not credited as the one who invented gunpowder. Ge Hong even went on to describe the explosion it makes. You mix the appropriate portions of sulfur, charcoal, and potassium nitrate to make it. People really began to put gunpowder to use in 700 AD during the T’ang Dynasty. The emperors during this dynasty used gunpowder in order to put up elaborate fireworks displays. But it was only in the year 904 AD when it was put to use...
Who Invented the Acoustic Guitar?

Who Invented the Acoustic Guitar?...

The modern history of the acoustic guitar began in 1850 with the work of the Spaniard Antonio Torres. In fact, Torres’ design is still being used to make classical guitars today. Guitar Development The word guitar was derived from the Spanish term guitarra. Although Torres’ work helped shape the modern guitar, guitar like instruments had been in existence for a very long time. Early instruments like the Baroque guitar, vihuela and lute played roles in the evolution of the modern acoustic guitar. There is actually evidence that ancient civilizations had developed something similar. Thousands of years ago, stringed instruments were already being used in India and other civilizations in Asia. Other instruments that were pivotal in the history of the acoustic guitar were the sitar and tanbur. Archaeologists have discovered a 3,300 year old carving showing a Hittite playing a guitar like instrument. Other Descendants of the Guitar The guitar is also thought to be derived from the Roman cithara. This instrument was introduced by the Romans first to Hispania circa 40 AD. Its development would be influenced by the oud, which was popularized by the Moors in the 8th century. Other stringed instruments began appearing in Europe around the same time. One of them was the six string lute, which was of Scandinavian origin. The history of the acoustic guitar shows that around 1200 AD, the guitarra moresca had emerged. It had numerous holes and was rounded. The guitarra Latina had a single hole and looked more like the modern guitar. By the Renaissance the moresca and Latina were no longer being used and both instruments were referred to as guitars. The vihuela originated in Spain and had six courses. The instrument was invented in Spain in the...
Who Invented CPR?

Who Invented CPR?

Introduction CPR stands for Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. It is one of the most important and universally practiced first-aid methods in the world. CPR is the only first aid treatment proven to save the life of a cardiac arrest victim until further help is arrives. Invention of CPR CPR was invented by Austrian surgeon Peter Safar. Safar was born in Vienna on the 12th of April, 1924. Both is parents worked in the medical profession. His father was a surgeon and his mother was a pediatrician. He studied medicine in the University of Vienna where he got his M.D. in 1948. Safer then specialized in surgery and oncology before traveling to Connecticut in 1950. There he studied at the Yale New Haven Hospital. Two years later he also completed studies in anesthesiology at the University of Philadelphia. Safar later got a job in Lima, Peru as overseer of the anesthesiology department there. Later he transferred to Baltimore, Maryland to do similar work. It was there he did research on current life saving techniques. Safer combined three existing methods in one: mouth to mouth resuscitation, head tilting and chest massage (or cardiac massage). These formed the basis for what will become the famous CPR technique. A humble man, Safar never tried to claim originality for his invention. He always said that he only put together techniques that were already known in his time. instead he worked hard to disseminate knowledge of CPR to as many people as people. He called the method “ABC” – for airway, breathing and heart circulation. Safar made progress in other areas of medicine as well. He helped build the biggest anesthesiology department in the country in Pittsburgh in 1961. There he devoted himself to improving critical care...
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