Who Invented the Fire Alarm?

Who Invented the Fire Alarm?...

The use of a fire alarm is far and wide. It is known to be a good device for detecting fire and some of the atmospheric changes in the air such as the sudden presence of smoke. Most businesses and also households use this to their advantage. With all these things, you probably think that everyone should know who invented the fire alarm. However, that is not the case. Not everyone really knows who invented the fire alarm let alone is actually interested to know when and where it all started. The Past Accounts of the Fire Alarm It was written in history that a man named Francis Robbins Upton invented the first fire alarm product. This was in the year 1890. However, it wasn’t promoted in the market during that time. In 1969, the device invented by Upton was then initially premiered in the market for commercial use. The Further Promulgation of Fire Alarms in American Soil It was years after that first invention had finally entered the United States. Currently, it is interesting to note that there are so many fire alarms installed around the country. According to reports, about ninety percent of American households have installed fire alarms for their use. These modern versions have a test button included to let the bearer check the effectivity of the alarm. The Safety System Offered by Fire Alarms Many households use this because of its complete security system offered. While it provides protection for fire or smoke accumulation, it also acts as a protection system against burglars. Aside from the households, these can also be seen in many other establishments such as schools, churches, and businesses. The Other Features of Fire Alarms When in use, the sound it...
Who Invented the Hydrogen Bomb?

Who Invented the Hydrogen Bomb?...

Portions of the development and history of the hydrogen bomb remain classified. But it is public knowledge that its chief architect was Dr. Edward Teller. The first H bomb (or thermonuclear bomb / fusion bomb) detonated was on November 1 1952 in Enewetak in the Marshall Islands. The Teller Ulam Design The hydrogen bomb is also called the Teller-Ulam design, after Edward Teller and Stanislaw Ulam who helped in the project too. Unlike other scientists who worked on the Manhattan Project, Teller continued his work on producing nuclear weapons. The idea for the hydrogen bomb was broached to Teller by his colleague Enrico Fermi in 1941. Teller was assigned to the Manhattan Project. But his preoccupation with the hydrogen bomb led to a falling out of sorts with Dr. Oppenheimer who was working on the atomic bomb. Hydrogen Bomb Tests The history of the hydrogen bomb shows Teller continued the work with Ulam after the Manhattan Project. After some initial difficulties, a small test was conducted in 1951. It was a success and another one was scheduled in 1952. The precise location was the Enewetak Atoll. The blast produced an explosion equivalent to 10 megatons. It was almost 500 times more powerful than the bomb dropped in Nagasaki. The bomb was nicknamed Sausage and weighed over 80 tons. In 1954 another hydrogen bomb (code named Shrimp) was detonated. It released a force of 15 megatons. It was the biggest one the US had ever detonated. The succeeding stages in the history of the hydrogen bomb in the US were centered on reducing its size. The goal was to fit it in missiles that could be carried by submarines. By the 1960s, megaton warheads were only a few hundred pounds...
Who Invented the Assembly Line?

Who Invented the Assembly Line?...

An assembly line refers to a special and efficient manufacturing process that was invented to promote the addition of parts of a certain product in a sequential and organized manner. Most capitalists and financiers use this process because it is faster and more effective than the typical handcrafting-type methods. However, sociologists oppose the implementation of this process in factories because it promotes boredom and social alienation. Before assessing the effects of this manufacturing process, it is best to look at the history behind the invention of the assembly line. Historical Background Who invented the assembly line? The manufacturing process was invented by Ransom E. Olds in 1901. He invented the process as a response to the improving demands for horseless carriages at this time. When he implemented the process in his factory, he was able to enhance the production of the factory to 425 cars in 1901 and 2,500 the following year. The process was popularized by Ford Motor Company in 1908. The company implemented the technique for the production of Ford Model T. The firm found the process more cost efficient since it uses machines to help in the production of the automobile. In addition to this, the company also found that the occurrence of industrial accidents were lessened since it implemented the process because workers specialized in a particular task. Additional Information and Other Important Details The main purpose for implementing the assembly line is to make the production of a particular product faster. In the case of Ford Motor Company, it can produced three to five automobiles in an hour with the use of this concept. In order to understand the benefits from the process, let us compare the production rate of an automobile company that...
Who Invented the Electric Water Heater?

Who Invented the Electric Water Heater?...

When you take showers or full baths nowadays, you can choose to have cold or hot water to wash yourself with. That is now one of the basic commodities that we have thanks to the person who invented the electric water heater years ago. Various Records of the Water Heater Some say that it was during the 1850s when an experiment started it all. However, there was no mention of the person who invented the electric water heater. That is why we can only speculate on the true creator since there are some accounts in history that mention some names of the possible creator but the inventions were done in different years. For the earliest record in the 1850s, water and bath were said to be used in the experiment. These were heated from underneath with the use of gas jets. Another account says that in the year 1868, there was an Englishman named Benjamin Maughan who was said to have invented the first water heater. This product was named as “The Geyser.” This particular device, that many thought to be a bit dangerous, was used to heat water flowing into the bath. And there are also others that say that it was indeed Edwin Ruud who created the first model of the water heater. However, there are some notes in the early years that mention Edwin Ruud, a Norwegian mechanical engineer, was merely initially influenced by the earlier invention of Maughan that is why Ruud’s creation was made afterwards. Ruud invention of the electric water heater (or automatic storage) was done in the year 1889. Later, Ruud founded the company called as the Ruud Manufacturing Company which carried a long line of these products. That is why many...
Who Invented the Sewing Machine?

Who Invented the Sewing Machine?...

Introduction A sewing machine is a machine designed to sew fabric or clothing together. Sewing has been around ever since man decided to wear clothes. The first needles and threads were made from animal parts such as horns, bones and sinews. Iron needles were invented in the 1500s. When the sewing machine was invented, it made mass production of clothes and fabrics much easier and affordable. Early Inventors the Sewing Machine Hand sewing is a slow process. For the clothing and fabric industries, it was also expensive. It meant having to pay more to tailors for work that took very long. So several inventors tried to address the problem by proposing mechanical sewing. In 1790 an Englishman named Thomas Saint was granted a patent for a sewing machine design. But there is no proof that Saint, a cabinet maker, ever built his machine. Later when a prototype was built based on his descriptions, it didn’t work. So he can’t be considered as the one who invented the sewing machine. In 1810, Balthasar Kremps of Germany made an unpatented design for sewing caps, but it was ineffective. Earlier in 1804 two patents were issued to two unsuccessful sewing machine designs: One to James Henderson and Thomas Stone in France, and another to John Duncan of Scotland. Joseph Madersperger of Austria came up with various sewing machine designs in 1814. Even though he got his patent, none of his inventions woked. Four years later in 1818, two Americans, John A. Doge and John Knowles failed in their attempt as well. Invention of the Sewing Machine It wasn’t until 1830 that the first successful sewing machine was invented. Its creator was another Frenchman, Barthelemy Thimonnier. His design had a chain stitch made...
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