Who Invented the Stagecoach?

Who Invented the Stagecoach?...

The history of the stagecoach in the US started in 1827 with Concord. It cost over $1,200 to $1,500. The stagecoaches were used to transport people as well as goods. Most of them weighed no less than 1,800 lbs. The Abbot Downing Company As stagecoaches gained popularity, its services began to spread throughout the States. The Abbot Downing Company created over 40 kinds of carriages. Their base was in New Hampshire. The company continued making carriages and wagons until 1919. At its height the company employed 300 people. Stagecoach Facts and Figures The seats were made of leather and each carriage was assigned a number. A look at the history of the stagecoach indicates it was known for its durability. The carriage had boots where luggage could be placed. There was also room at the top of the carriage where other items could be stored. Each stagecoach could carry nine people. It had roll down curtains and three sets of seats inside. If filled to capacity, each individual had 15 inches of space. The carriage moved at an average of 8 mph. There were different types of rides available, with first class travel costing $7. The stagecoach was also used to deliver mail and other goods. Even during the Civil War these carriages continued to ply their trade. Stagecoaches around the World The history of the stagecoach in Europe began earlier in Europe. The exact date is uncertain. However, depictions of stagecoaches were seen in English illustrations in the mid 1200s. However it was not invented and used until the 1500s in Britain. As it became popular, coaching inns spread throughout the continent. Stages and stations also emerged in the US. There are reports that Shakespeare’s plays were conducted...
Who Invented Algebra?

Who Invented Algebra?

Algebra. For most of us, it is one of the banes of school life. Many see it as an adverse course, an unnecessary complication for one’s academics. It is then not rare for students to joke about their contempt for the inventor of the subject. Well, it maybe a playful joke but it does lead to an important question: who invented algebra anyway? Now, some may not pursue the thought of finding out the creator of their much-hated subject but for those who will do, it will be a fruitful exercise as it will make one realize the importance of the role that algebra played in human progress. So who invented algebra? Most of us are accustomed with inventions having a definite inventor: a single individual, like Thomas Edison for the light bulb, or a specific group of people like Chinese for gun powder. This is not the case with algebra however. Asking who invented algebra will give you the Arabs who are widely credited for the creation of the said branch of mathematics but there are also those that believe the Babylonians are the ones that must be given credit for inventing the algebra. But where does this rift concerning the question who invented algebra come from? As can be seen from the word itself, algebra, which comes from the Arabic al-jabr, one of the basic operations discussed in the influential book made by Arabs about the subject, Arabs contributed a lot to the subject. So much was their contribution that only through the translation of their works did the West learned much about algebra. The modern word that is algebra came into being only when the book was translated from Arabic into Latin by a Western scholar...
Who Invented the Pencil Sharpener?

Who Invented the Pencil Sharpener?...

A look at the history of pencil sharpeners shows that the Frenchman Bernard Lassimone was the first to get a patent for pencil sharpeners in 1828. Following his invention, other designers made improvements and refinements. The Early Pencil Sharpeners Pencils had been invented before the sharpener and people used knives to sharpen them. It was a tedious process and the result was uneven. After Lassimone’s invention, Therry des Estwaux came out with a mechanical sharpener in 1844. It took a while before the devices were accepted. But by 1865 companies were already manufacturing pencil sharpeners. A company called Eureka filed a patent for a small sharpener sometime in the mid 1860s. By the 1880s, several companies started producing them in larger numbers. One of the most well known companies in the early history of pencil sharpeners was Eagle Pencil Company in New York. A Look at Early Pencil Sharpeners From the 1880s to the early 1900s, many kinds of pencil sharpeners were developed in Europe and America. The electric sharpeners came out around 1917, but other types were produced. 1916’s New Era Pencil Sharpener resembled a plunger. The pencil would be placed inside the device and press it again and again. This process sharpened the blade. Another unique device was the Babock Duplex Pencil Sharpener. The device was patented in 1900 and came with a rotary of 6 blades. The history of pencil sharpeners shows that it was operated in the following manner. When the pencil was inserted, the blades would rotate around it. The right hand operates the crank that rotates the blade. The left hand operates the metal bar. One of the earliest sharpeners was invented by Guhl and Hurbeck in 1897 in Germany. It was called...
Who Invented Ink?

Who Invented Ink?

For years man had been carving into clay, stone, or wood to write a record of his life and experiences. But when ink and paper came, it revolutionized writing for all time. They are still in use today. Thus, it’s interesting to know who invented ink. Egyptians or Chinese? Many say it was the Egyptians who invented ink. They also say paper was invented by an Egyptian, because “paper” comes from the word “papyrus” which grew abundantly in the Nile region. But recorded history shows that both writing implements—paper and ink—were invented by Chinese men. The paper inventor was T’sai-Lun and the ink inventor was Tien-Lcheu. Egyptians are often deemed the first users of ink. And that an Egyptian was who invented ink. This is because of the common notion that paper was invented by an Egyptian. True, papyrus was in wide use in Egypt for writing in early times. But they used stylus to carve figures on papyrus instead of black ink. Stylus is a pointed thin rod. Ink was first applied using a brush made of bird’s feather. With this invention, the ink inventor simplified writing and made it so convenient. From Gelatin and Oil He probably got tired of having his hand and fingers denting out marks on wood, stone, or papyrus. In 2607 B.C., Tien, a great thinker being a philosopher, simplified writing. He formulated a dark liquid for marking on stones and papers. He took soot from pine wood then mixed this with oil used in lamps. Tien made gelatin out of the skin of a donkey and musk. He mixed this with the soot and oil. Innovations By 1200 B.C. this black liquid writing implement became popular and other people developed it further...

Who Invented Mother’s Day?...

The history of Mother’s Day in the US started on May 12th, 1908. That was when Anna Jarvis began campaigning for a day to honor mothers worldwide. After the United States adopted it in 1914, other countries followed suit. It is celebrated on the second Sunday of May in the US but other countries use different dates. Antecedents A look at historical records will show that ancient people also set aside days for mothers. The exact origin of this practice is unknown. However, some historians believe it arose from an early form of earth goddess worship. There is evidence the Romans had their own version of Mother’s Day called Matronalia. This was a day dedicated to the goddess Juno. Mothers were special to her. For this reason, the day was marked by gift giving to mothers. Several European countries have always put aside a Sunday just for mothers. This day is known as Laetare Sunday. The chosen Sunday would vary, but among Catholics it was the fourth Sunday at Lent. This date was actually intended for the Virgin Mary and the mother church. But the history of Mother’s Day shows it became an occasion to celebrate motherhood. Today many countries use the date on the fourth Sunday of Lent. Besides the United Kingdom, other European countries also celebrate Mother’s Day on this date. Mother’s Day in Africa and the Middle East The day is celebrated in many African countries. The modern concept of Mother’s Day was adopted from the British. The way it is celebrated varies per country. Usually it is a mixture of local customs with some European elements included. In many Arab countries the day is celebrated on March 12. Bangladesh and Bolivia The day is celebrated...
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