Who Invented Plastic Wrap?

Who Invented Plastic Wrap?...

Plastic wrap is such a common and ordinary thing you can find in every house every day. If you have food left over after a meal it is sometimes quite common to put them in a plate and cover them with this film. The idea is to cover and seal off any food you want to put inside containers in order to keep them fresh. Its invention is credited to Ralph Wiley from Dow Chemical. You will usually get plastic wrap in rolls contained in boxes. Each box usually comes with a cutting edge to make cutting the plastic film a lot easier. Every plastic film sticks to containers like an adhesive sealing food tight. It takes on different names depending on the location. In the United Kingdom, it’s called a cling-film. Some people in the United States call it cling wrap while it is called glad wrap. Invention of the Plastic Wrap The very first sheet of plastic ever used for wrapping anything was called cellophane. It was invented by Jacques Brandenberger, a Swiss chemist, in 1911. It was used as packaging and was quite favored due to the fact that it was transparent. However, it was never used to wrap or seal food. Needless to say, that isn’t the same as the plastic wrap that we use nowadays. The plastic wrap that we are familiar with is used primarily to wrap or cover food. Saran is the very first sheet of plastic to be used to wrap food. Saran or Saran Wrap is a trade name of Dow Chemical. This actually refers to various polymers and monomers that has properties that act like a barrier. Compared to other plastics, this plastic wrap is able to contain aroma...
Who Invented the Hybrid Car?

Who Invented the Hybrid Car?...

The hybrid car is such a suitable mode of transportation in these times of environmental and economic concerns that we tend to think of it as a recent modern invention. Actually, these vehicles have been in development for several years now. In fact, it may surprise one to know that they have been in development as far back as even before the 20th century! It was in 1665 when Ferdinand Verbiest, a Jesuit priest and astronomer, began designing a four-wheeled self-moving wagon powered by steam. Verbiest is known to have toiled on the design well into 1680, but there is no known record that the machine ever worked or if it was even built in the first place. The first working steam-powered vehicle would be built by a Frenchman named Nicholas Cugnot in 1769. Capable of traveling at 6 miles per hour, the downside to Cugnot’s creation was that it could not produce sufficient steam to move any faster, as well as being unable to carry adequate amount of fuel to travel farther. In the succeeding years, there would be several more attempts to invent an alternatively-driven horseless carriage; most notably by employing a then-emerging new power source, electricity. A number of inventors emerged who might have laid claim to having been the first who invented the hybrid car, had it not been for certain flaws that would appear in their designs. A Scotsman named Robert Anderson developed the first electric-powered car in 1839, which was much acclaimed during its time but nonetheless suffered the problem of how its automotive batteries could maintain their charge. In 1870, a certain Sir David Salomon devised an electric-powered vehicle that had a light motor and a very heavy battery, but these innovations...
Who Invented Cereal?

Who Invented Cereal?

According to history, it was the American Seventh-day Adventists who were the ones who invented cereal. During their time, they estaliblished a group in the 1860s and it was known as the Western Health Reform Institute. The Adventists continuously manufactured cereal foods, widely promoted the use of these wholesome cereals, and sold these products. The ones they invented were originally the first modern and commercial products of cereals. The Invention of Corn Flakes After a few years, around 1894, Will Keith Kellogg searched for a better substitute of bread to be included in the diet of hospital patients. What Kellogg was looking for had to be more digestible and had to include boiling wheat to further improve the patients’ food intake. So, Kellogg placed some wheat in a pot and left it to boil. But, accidentally, the boiling process took longer than intended. That is why when it was time to roll or soften the wheat and make it dry, what Kellogg found out was that each grain became a thin and large flake that proved to be a very delicious cereal. That was the first invention of corn flakes by Kellogg who later established a foundation in 1906 called as the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Kellogg, a Seventh-day Adventist, also founded another company, the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, in the year 1906. And it can be inferred that cereals took a different turn in history ever since, and became more well-known to many. Other Forms and Flavors of Cereals In 1929, the Kellogg Company introduced another cereal food – rice krispies. Because of the popularity of these cereal foods, other people saw the potential of a large market. Hence, Charles William Post, an American manufacturer, was also...
Who Invented the Telegraph?

Who Invented the Telegraph?...

It was Samuel Morse’s demo of an electric telegraph in 1838 that popularized the machine. The history of the telegraph began years before Morse’s invention, but it was his invention that was able to send messages in a consistent manner. The Beginnings of the Telegraph In 1794, Claude Chappe came up with a non electric telegraph. Chappe’s invention employed a semaphore and flag based alphabets. It also required line of sight. The first electrochemical telegraph was invented in 1808 in Bavaria. Samuel Soemmering employed 35 wires together with gold electrodes immersed in water. The messages could be sent a few thousand feet away. In the United States, the first telegraph prototype to be developed was courtesy of Harrison Dyar. His invention used chemically treated paper to make dots. The chemically treated paper allowed him to relay the electric sparks. William Sturgeon’s Electromagnet The history of the telegraph changed when the British inventor William Sturgeon created the electromagnet in 1825. He first showed how the device could lift heavy objects. Sturgeon used a 7 ounce iron enfolded by wires and a battery cell. It would also form the basis for future telegraphs. The Electric Telegraph Emerges In 1830, American inventor Joseph Henry (1797-1878) displayed the electromagnet’s potential. He sent an electric current over a mile long wire. This turned on an electromagnet that set off a bell. Using the same principles, British physicists Charles Wheatstone and William Cooke unveiled the Cooke and Whetstone telegraph a few years later. But while these early telegraphs were workable, it was Samuel Morse (1791-1872) who was able to utilize the electromagnet most successfully. He was able to combine it with Joseph Henry’s machine which no else could do. This would alter the history of...
Who Invented the Radio?

Who Invented the Radio?

While the inventors of other devices and technologies are easy to pinpoint and identify, it is unfortunately not the case for the humble radio. This is because no individual can lay sole claim to the invention of the radio as it is a device that has been developed over time until it reached its final form today. So answering the question “Who invented the radio?” will not be a simple task as it will require a bit of a history lesson since the development of the radio by the numerous individuals involved with it spanned across decades. Each of the scientists and inventors that will be discussed are all commonly referred to as an inventor of the radio because of the breadth and depth of their pioneering work on radio technology. If being widely-regarded will be the main criteria, the answer to the question “Who invented the radio?” will be Gugliemo Marconi. Credited for making the first radio signal across the Atlantic Ocean in 1902, Marconi also showed the practicability of utilizing the capabilities of radio communication. He later won the Nobel Prize for his work on radio technology. If, on the other hand, being first is the main criteria, then the name of Sir Oliver Lodge will be the answer to the question “Who invented the radio?” This is because Lodge has the distinction for being the first human to send a radio signal using his coherer, a radio device which he developed into perfection. Heinrich Hertz can also be another name that can be supplied to answer the question “Who invented the radio?” This is because of his important work on radio, which proved the existence of electromagnetic waves, made possible the construction of systems that transmit...
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