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Who Invented Chicken Fingers?

Who Invented Chicken Fingers?...

Chicken fingers are also known as chicken nuggets. Many probably know this delicious food from a well-known burger chain known as McDonald’s who continuously serve this to their many frequent customers. But was it really McDonald’s who invented chicken fingers? False Credit While McDonald’s is more commonly the first thing that would come to mind when the words “chicken nuggets” or chicken fingers is mentioned, they are not really the original creator of this scrumptious food. So, who invented chicken fingers or nuggets? The First Nugget Recipe According to historical accounts, it was really Robert Baker who published the first recipe for this yummy food during the 1950s but this was distributed as an unpatented school work. Baker was a frequent traveler, and had contributed to interesting changes in the people’s behavior, views, and acceptance towards eating chicken. While studying at the Cornell University from the years 1957 to 1989, Baker was able to publish two hundred ninety research papers. As part of that academic work is the recipe that had paved the way for the innovation of the chicken. Other Achievements Baker also had other achievements. In the year 1970, Baker had founded the Institute of Food Science and Marketing of the university. Another achievement that was garnered by Baker was in 1997 when Baker was elected in the Institute of Food Technologists as a fellow. Other food innovations are also credited to Baker. The creator had more than forty innovations which included turkey, cold cut, and poultry. That was why Baker became the “Thomas Edison of poultry.” Aside from inventing the chicken fingers or nuggets, Baker is also the first to learn how to bind breading to the chicken, created turkey ham and turkey hot dogs, and...
Who Invented the Peace Sign?

Who Invented the Peace Sign?...

When we talk about the peace sign we would generally recall a circle with three lines inside. You are quite familiar with it if you were a child of the baby boomer generation when its use was quite prevalent. However, it wasn’t originally intended to be used a symbol for peace or a sign of peace. In fact, it wasn’t the first symbol to be used to denote peace. Creation of the Peace Sign A British artist by the name of Gerald Holtom is credited for creating the three-lined circle for peace. It wasn’t originally designed as a worldwide symbol for peace but was meant for another purpose. It was originally created for the nuclear disarmament movement in Britain. Holtom completed his design on February 21, 1958. It was used in a march conducted on April fourth of that same year. The march started from Trafalgar Square in London all the way to the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment. The Direct Action Committee Against Nuclear War commissioned the creation of this symbol. Adoption and Later Use Gerald Holtom’s design was later adopted for other purposes. It was first adopted for quite similar purposes and movements. However, as it became a really popular symbol it was also adopted by other movements as well. It was later used for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Later on during the anti-war movement of the 1960’s, Holtom’s symbol was also put to use. After that, it was later used by what was then the popular counterculture. Even Gerald Holtom would never have guessed that his design would cross oceanic borders or would be put to use for other purposes as well. His design came to the United States in the year 1958. A pacifist protester...
Who Invented Jazz?

Who Invented Jazz?

Even the most ardent student of the history of jazz will be hard pressed to trace its inventor. Rather than point to a single individual, it’s more accurate to say that the sound emerged from various musical sources. Beginnings of Jazz Music Some accounts state the word jazz was first heard in Chicago. It is unclear where it came or from what it was derived from. Its origins have also been disputed. Some claim the music originated from Africa. This influence can be seen from some common elements found in jazz. These are improvisation, swung note and polyrhythm among others. But most accounts of the history of jazz trace its roots in the 1890s. Black people in America were given the chance to hold jobs. Segregation was still enforced. But they were able to find work as entertainers. Blacks worked at vaudeville, minstrel and other musical shows. Various forms of music remerged including ragtime and the blues. From these and other genres, jazz would come out. The 1900s to 1920s It was during this time that jazz as we know it came into being. It became very popular in New Orleans. Most of the early jazz musicians played in the red light district of New Orleans. One of the earliest known jazz musicians was Buddy Bolden. He began playing in 1900 and is considered by many as the first man of jazz. The 1920s saw the arrival of the phonograph and radio. These two innovations had a tremendous effect on the history of jazz. Once limited to the south, their music was now heard across the country. Bessie Smith became known as the Empress of the Blues and the most well known singer of the 1920s. Other performers during...
Who Invented Paper?

Who Invented Paper?

The word “paper” came from the word “papyrus.” Papyrus was a plant abundant in Egypt. However, the acknowledged inventor of paper was a Chinese. So remember, as far as who invented paper is concerned, according to recorded history, the answer is a Chinese. The account below is how paper began. T’sai Lun Of China is the Winner! About 105 A.D. (some say 2000 years ago), there was a man from Lei-Yang, China named T’sai Lun. He was a courtier. He separated the fibers of huge wet mush. Paper is a mixture of pulped wood fibers and cotton or flax. They are pressed together then dried under the sun. That was what he did. That was how paper began. He spread it on a cloth mat framed with bamboo. After the sun had dried up the fiber mixture a new product emerged—paper. Thus, it is a by-product of other materials. But Paper is not Papyrus T’sai Lun may have had competitors in Egypt before for the title of who invented paper. But after careful weighing of facts, it was unanimously decided that he was really the one who invented paper. The papyrus that the Egyptians used was not really paper; it was more the bark of a plant, a raw unprocessed material. Paper, by definition, is a processed material derived from several raw materials. So the first man on earth who came up with the brilliant idea of inventing paper was T’sai Lun. Earlier Records of Writing Materials To be sure, man had been using writing materials long before T’sai Lun invented paper. As in the case of other inventions, he developed other people’s works. Man first wrote on rocks, on cave walls, on wood, on stone tablets or wet...
Who Invented the Steam Engine?

Who Invented the Steam Engine?...

The history of steam engines points to Thomas Savery (1650-1715) as its inventor. He created the engine in 1698 but the basic principles were already known years before. The Evolution of the Steam Engine In the first century AD, Hero of Alexandria had detailed the fundamental principles of the steam engine. The steam turbines that Taqi al Din and Giovanni Branca made (in 1551 and 1629) were mainly for assessing the properties of steam. They were not actually put to any practical use. Savery’s invention in 1698 was the first practical application of steam. It was a water pump and used in some pumping stations. The history of steam engines asserts that the early models sometimes failed to work. In 1712, Thomas Newcomen invented the atmospheric engine. Newcomen’s design was actually an improvement over Savery’s machine. It was mostly used for water pumping too, but it could also be used for draining. James Watt’s Engine While Newcomen’s work help usher in the Industrial Age, it was James Watt’s innovations that helped make steam engine more practical. His pumping engine needed 78% less coal than Newcomen’s device. Watt also included a rotary motion. This allowed the device to be used for moving factory equipment. This meant factories no longer had to be built near rivers or water sources. Watt’s invention was still an atmospheric engine. This meant power was produced by the vacuum from the condensed steam. The history of steam engines changed with Richard Trevithick’s new engines. Trevithick’s Engines Trevithick’s engines utilized high pressure. Compared with Watt’s engine, this was much more powerful. Its small size also made it ideal for usage in transport. The engine came to be recognized as a power source. In 1801 Trevithick created the...
Who Invented the Skyscraper?

Who Invented the Skyscraper?...

Defined as a super tall building that is continuously habitable, a skyscraper is a fascinating invention. The Empire State Building in New York City, the Willis Tower in Chicago and the Taipei 101 in Taiwan are just some of the most impressive skyscrapers ever created. Today, these buildings serve as practical solutions to the increasing scarcity of land worldwide. Aside from these things, it is also good to know the history of these tall buildings including who invented the skyscraper. The Invention of the Skyscraper Who invented the skyscraper? After he created the first ever load-bearing structural frame for the Home Insurance Building within the City of Chicago in Illinois in 1885, it is but right to credit architect William Le Baron Jenney as the Father of American skyscrapers. The ten-storey building was the very first skyscraper in the world. In 1891, American architects Louis Sullivan and Dankmar Adler designed the Wainwright Building in Saint Louis, Missouri. It was also a ten-storey building. However, many people considered it the first true skyscraper rather than the Home Insurance Building because it was constructed with steel frames. Furthermore, it featured vertical bands, which helped emphasized the building’s height even more. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Information After the early skyscrapers were created, fire restrictions and height limits were introduced. In 1895, the American Surety Building was completed in New York. It was the tallest building during that time. In 1930, the Chrysler Building was completed in New York City. In 1931, the Empire State Building, which was comprised of 102 floors, was completed. In 1932, the Boerentoren was constructed in Antwerp, Belgium. It was made up of 26 floors. In 1940, the Torre Piacentini was completed with 31 floors within the...
Who Invented Silly Putty?

Who Invented Silly Putty?...

Silly Putty (also known as Nutty Putty) is a trademark owned by Crayola for silicone polymers. The products are sold today in grocery stores and shopping malls as toys for children. Additionally, silicone polymers have important scientific and medical uses. Most physical therapists use the polymers for the treatments of hand injuries. Aside from this, the materials are also helpful for reducing stress level. Above all, these were used to secure the things inside the spaceship of Apollo astronauts when they reached zero-gravity areas in the orbit. To know more about the product, let us start with the person who was credited for Silly Putty. History of the Trademark Who invented Silly Putty? Some reports said that it was Dow Corning owner Earl Warrick developed silicone polymers but Crayola believed that Scottish inventor James Wright invented the material in 1943. Both Warrick and Wright realized that when silicone oil and boric acid were combined, these would produce certain chemical reaction. The reaction would produce a bouncy and gooey material that has numerous unique characteristics or properties. It could be stretched out like the regular rubber and it could bounce like a ball when it was dropped. In addition, the researchers found that the material has a high melting temperature. To make money out of the invention, Wright sent samples of silicone polymers to various companies in the world. In 1949, toy store owner Ruth Fallgatter marketed the material in a clear package for $2. The item was the best-selling item in the store next to Crayola crayons. Fallgatter’s marketing consultant Peter Hodgson saw the potential of the product. He marketed the putty in plastic eggs and he offered the toys to the students of Yale University for $1. He...
Who Invented the Toothbrush?

Who Invented the Toothbrush?...

It is said that the greatest of inventions are those that are brimming with simplicity but still prove to be tools full of utility. If this is really the case, then the humble toothbrush can be regarded as one of the greatest inventions of all time, with its minimum complexity (or outright lack of it) and its indispensability in our modern way of life. The toothbrush has become one of the most essential tools of our modern, civilized, way of living. So much importance is given to oral hygiene today that most people are not aware that there was a time when the toothbrush was still just a figment in the imagination of the man who invented it. Before the toothbrush was invented, people around the world used different methods maintaining proper oral hygiene. Plant stalks, twigs from trees, feathers and quills from different animals are just examples of what can be regarded as the prototypes of the toothbrush. Civilizations such as those from India and Arabia primarily used plant parts to clean their teeth. The ancient book Ayurveda instructed its readers to utilize some parts of one tree indigenous to India to take care of their teeth. Likewise, Muslims also used the twigs of a native tree that has inherent antiseptic properties to fight tooth decay and cavities. Immediately before the toothbrush was invented, most people took care of their oral hygiene by using a cloth to wipe their teeth. The cloth is commonly used in tandem with soot and salt so as to add some antibacterial properties to the process. It is during this time when the modern toothbrush was invented due to one man’s discontent with the way people’s teeth are taken care. So who invented...
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